sapphire valley

Lonesome Valley: Where Life is Simplified, and Living is Embraced

 

The rock face at Lonesome Valley

The rock face at Lonesome Valley

With a history dating back to 1895, Lonesome Valley has served as a bastion to the great outdoors ever since Pittsburg entrepreneur and visionary E.H. Jennings first acquired 35,000 acres near the sleepy village of Cashiers. While Mr. Jennings is responsible for developing one of Western North Carolinas most popular resort destinations, he chose to preserve Lonesome Valley as a special place to share with his friends and family. Gracefully spanning the valley floor of the largest box canyon east of the Rockies, Lonesome Valley is said by many to be the place where Heaven and Earth meet. For more than a century, the Jennings family has continued to take great care to maintain the history and natural beauty of this unique mountain treasure.

 

Carefully developed in accordance with the Jennings familys wishes, amenities and homes within this stunning community complement the natural beauty of the area. Lonesome Valley has quickly become one of Cashiers most sought after developments. Cottage and home designs pay homage to the Southern Appalachian farmhouses of a bygone era. Dining within the community highlights Southern cuisine made with fresh produce grown in the Valley. The Canyon Kitchen is currently open for the season on Thursdays through Sundays, and features the culinary talents of Chef John Fleer (formerly of the renowned Blackberry Farm in Tennessee). The Canyon Kitchen is located inside Jennings Barn at the heart of the Lonesome Valley community, and reservations are recommended.

Silver Creek Real Estate Group is proud to announce that we are now highlighting several incredible homes and amazing lots available for purchase in Lonesome Valley on our website. A handful of new-construction cabins, cottages and homes are available for immediate move-in, or select your own view from a series of incredible home sites currently being offered. For photo tours and more information on Lonesome Valley in Cashiers, North Carolina, click on the following two links: Lonesome Valley land or homes for sale. When youre ready to buy or build the home of your dreams, contact one of the talented brokers at Silver Creek by calling us at (828) 742-1999, dropping by our offices located just west of the Cashiers Crossroads in The Shoppes at CreekSide, or by filling out our online contact form . We look forward to meeting you and introducing you to one of Cashiers most visually stunning communities.

Sapphire Valley, North Carolina

A Jewel of a Find in the Blue Ridge Mountains

Originating as primarily a gold and gem mine town Sapphire, North Carolina is a jewel of a find along the Highlands-Cashiers Plateau. In the early 19th Century, the Sapphire Valley region was reportedly the nations leading gold producing area until the California Gold Rush of 1849. Conjecture either has it that the town of Sapphire was named for the bounty of beautiful blue gems also found in the local mines or for the crystal blue skies visible above the mountaintops.

In the late 1800s, Pittsburgh entrepreneur E.H. Jennings purchased thousands of acres of wilderness in Western North Carolinas Jackson and Transylvania counties through his venture, the Toxaway Company. The original mission was to build a railroad from Hendersonville to Toxaway to carry the felled timber to the Toxaway Company sawmill, and from there the lumber to the shipping points. It wasnt long before Jennings saw beyond trees for lumber to the natural beauty of the Blue Ridge Mountains. This early visionary decided to create a resort destination, and dubbed the area The Switzerland of the South. He built resorts in nearby Cashiers and Lake Toxaway, as well as the Fairfield Inn on Lake Fairfield in the Sapphire Valley. The Inn, built in the style of a Swiss Alpine Lodge in 1896, was added to the National Registry of Historic Places in 1982, but had to be closed and torn down after a fire in 1986.

Home to the Sapphire Mountain Brewing Company, Sapphires local tavern was established in 1888 near the Horsepasture River Gold Mine to serve thirsty miners. Now primarily serving thirsty golfers and hungry patrons, great care has been given to preserving the original ambience of this historical brewery. From the saloon flooring, to whisky barrels, to stone blocks in the fireplace all more than a century old much of the original structure has been moved from its initial location to its new position overlooking the beautiful Sapphire National Golf Course.

Sapphire is also home to the historic Camp Merrie-Woode. Since 1919, this very special summer camp has been inspiring girls and young women to appreciate the simple life and natural beauty, while emphasizing the importance of a lifetime of service. Serving thousands of campers since its inception, each individual at Camp Merrie-Woode is valued for who she is and who she will become. Camp Merrie-Woode is listed on the National Register of Historic Places for its original Adirondack-style structures.

 

Fairfield Lake, Sapphire Valley NC

Fairfield Lake, Sapphire Valley NC

 

Today, E.H. Jenningss original vision of a resort destination is still alive and well. Although his original beloved Fairfield Inn is no more, Sapphire is perhaps best known for its most popular destination, Wyndham Resort at Fairfield's Sapphire Valley. This outstanding family-friendly resort offers an abundance of amenities and activities, including the 50-acre Sapphire Lake, the 18-hole PGA Sapphire National Golf Course, 9-hole golf course, one indoor and two outdoor swimming pools, ten tennis courts, health club with state-of-the-art fitness equipment, boating and fishing on the lake, horseback riding, game room, massage services, miniature golf and more. The resort has partnered with a number of area communities to share their facilities with local residents. A handful of these communities include Bald Rock, Cedar Hill, Country Club Estates, Deer Run, Eagle Ridge, Falcon Ridge, FiveStone, Fox Run Ridge, Golf Club Estates, Holly Forest I - XIV, Round Hill, Sapphire High, Stonecreek Crossing, The Divide at Bald Rock and Whisper Lake.

Another destination that serves as a major draw to Sapphire and sets it apart from some of the other local communities is the Sapphire Valley Ski Resort. Opportunities to ski or snowboard the slopes rest on the resorts two downhill runs one with a 200 foot vertical drop at 1,600 feet in length, and one considerably milder "bunny hill". The resort also features a fun two-lane tube park called Frozen Falls.

Most importantly, Sapphire stands out fo its natural beauty. Portions of the U.S. National Forestry's Panthertown Valley lie within Sapphire filled with miles of hiking trails, cascading waterfalls and acre after acre of unspoiled forest.

Neighborhoods in Sapphire vary from affordable single-family homes to luxury mountain estates. For more information about Sapphire and its many excellent community offerings, call the team of experienced local brokers at Silver Creek Real Estate Group at <a href="tel:+18287431999">828.743.1999</a> or drop by our offices in the Shoppes at CreekSide located just west of the Cashiers Crossroads. To view homes and properties for sale, visit our Sapphire Communities and Subdivisions page at www.ncliving.com. We invite you to take advantage of the current buyers market, and find a jewel of your own in WNCs outstanding Sapphire Valley.

Information courtesy of sapphirevalleyresort.com, sapphiremountainbrewingcompany.com and merriewoode.com.

Sapphire Valley NC Visitors & Real Estate Guide

Sapphire Valley, North Carolina

Originating as primarily a mining town, Sapphire, North Carolina is a "jewel" of a find along the Highlands-Cashiers Plateau. Perhaps best known for its most popular destination, Wyndham Resort at Fairfield's Sapphire Valley, Sapphire offers an abundance of amenities and activities. The resort has partnered with a number of area communities to share their facilities with local residents.

Another destination that serves as a draw to Sapphire and sets it apart from some of the other local communities is the Sapphire Valley Ski Resort. Opportunities to ski or snowboard the slopes rest on the resorts two downhill runs one with a 200 foot vertical drop at 1,600 feet in length, and one considerably milder "bunny hill". The resort also features a fun two-lane tube park called Frozen Falls. Sapphire is also home to the Sapphire Mountain Brewing Company, a lively pub located overlooking the Sapphire National Golf Course.

Sapphire also stands out for its natural beauty. Portions of the U.S. National Forestry's Panthertown Valley lie within Sapphire, filled with miles of hiking trails, cascading waterfalls and unspoiled forest. Neighborhoods in Sapphire vary from affordable single-family homes to luxury mountain estates.

Our website and blog provide you with a complete list of restaurants, golf courses, skiing, and much more. We have also provided you a Visitors Guide for the entire Cashiers, Highlands, Sapphire, and Lake Glenville area.

Communities in Sapphire Valley, North Carolina

Many communities in Sapphire and the surrounding area are afforded access to all of the incredible amenities available at Wyndham Resort at Fairfield's Sapphire Valley. These amenities include the 50-acre Sapphire Lake, the 18-hole PGA Sapphire National Golf Course, 9-hole golf course, one indoor and two outdoor swimming pools, ten tennis courts, health club with state-of-the-art fitness equipment, boating and fishing on the lake, horseback riding, game room, massage services, miniature golf and more. Communities offering access to Fairfield's Sapphire Valley include: Bald Rock, Cedar Hill, Country Club Estates, Deer Run, Eagle Ridge, Falcon Ridge, FiveStone, Fox Run Ridge, Golf Club Estates, Holly Forest I - XIV, Round Hill, Sapphire High, Stone Creek Estates, Stonecreek Crossing, The Divide at Bald Rock and Whisper Lake.

Silver Creek Real Estate Group has included below a list of some of Sapphire Valley's most exciting communities and subdivisions. Whether you're seeking a family vacation home, quaint retirement cottage or looking to make a real estate investment in Sapphire Valley, Silver Creek brokers are experts in the local market. Contact us today!

Bald Rock

This 776-acre private gated community prides itself in being "a civilized wilderness" by combining luxury mountain living on estate-sized lots with the majesty and splendor of a beautiful natural setting. Bald Rock is adjacent to the U.S. Forest Services' Panthertown Valley, providing 6,700 acres of unspoiled forests, a rare Appalachian bog, 20 miles of trout streams, waterfalls and miles of walking trails offering plenty of opportunities for hiking and exploring. A Westmark Development, Bald Rock's home sites in vary in size from three to an astounding twelve acres, and offer incredible views of the valley, the forest and the mountains beyond. The community features an equestrian center, stables, riding arena and a network of trails for sightseeing by horseback. Residents of Bald Rock have access to all of the amenities of Wyndham Resort at Fairfield's Sapphire Valley, including golf, swimming, tennis and much more.

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Burlingame at Sapphire Lakes

Established in 1983, Burlingame at Sapphire Lakes is an equity club and master-planned community in the mountains of Western North Carolina. Burlingame Country Club lies at the heart of the development and features an exquisitely appointed Clubhouse with three dining rooms and two lounges, as well as a 24-hour fitness center, top-ranked championship 18-hole golf course, four Har-Tru tennis courts and one hard court, heated swimming pool and endless opportunities for outdoor recreation. Real estate opportunities in Burlingame range from scenic riverfront home sites and luxury mountain view homes to rustic lodge-inspired condos that line the golf course.

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Deer Run

A fairly intimate enclave of just 50 homes and home sites, Deer Run is a gated community located within five miles of the historic town of Cashiers. Residents of Deer Run have access to all of the amenities of Wyndham Resort at Fairfield's Sapphire Valley, including golf, fitness center, swimming and tennis.

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The Divide at Bald Rock

Situated along the Eastern Continental Divide, bordered by the natural beauty of Panthertown Valley and adjacent to the prestigious Bald Rock community, The Divide at Bald Rock offers an eclectic blend of estate-sized home sites and cozy cabin lots. Encompassing 244 acres and set at elevations topping 4,500 feet above sea level, views from the Divide include cascading waterfalls, abundant foliage and awe-inspiring views of the mountains and valley floor. The Divide features an open-air pavilion for family and community gatherings, which includes a full kitchen and two stacked stone fireplaces. The equestrian center at Bald Rock is available to residents of The Divide, as are all of the amenities of Wyndham Resort at Fairfield's Sapphire Valley, including golf, swimming, tennis and much more.

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Falcon Ridge

A 290-acre limited development community in the Sapphire area of Western North Carolina, Falcon Ridge is designed to showcase luxury mountain homes living in harmony with the mountain laurel, wildflowers, waterfalls and wildlife that surrounds them. More than three-quarters of the community have been earmarked as green space, allowing for only 60 very special home sites within Falcon Ridge. At an elevation of 4500 feet above sea level on Hogback Mountain, each home site allows for amazing views of the surrounding mountain range, the Sapphire Valley below and long-range views stretching into parts of both North and South Carolina. Residents of Falcon Ridge enjoy mild temperatures year round, as well as a lovely three-acre meadow with community pavilion and outdoor bonfire ring on the property. Falcon Ridge homeowners are also granted access to the amenities of Wyndham Resort at Fairfield's Sapphire Valley.

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FiveStone

This exclusive gated community of just 18 lots set on 53 beautiful acres, FiveStone is a must-see. Located at an elevation of 4,000 feet above sea level, within a few hundred yards of the Trailhead for Panthertown Valley National Forest, this community is a nature lover's dream. Lovely views of the waterfalls, lakes, streams and forests of the area combine with the backdrop of the mountain ranges beyond for incomparable panoramas. Residents of FiveStone are also granted access to the amenities of Wyndham Resort at Fairfield's Sapphire Valley, including golf, swimming, tennis and more.

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Golf Club Estates

Nestled behind the gates of the Country Club of Sapphire Valley is the single family community of Golf Club Estates. On the 106 lots you will find mostly seasonal residents. Meander around Cherokee Trail as it follows the private eighteen hole golf course of Country Club of Sapphire Valley. The fantastic views of Chimney Top, Bald Rock and Rock Mountain greet you further on Golf View Road. There is plenty of golf, tennis, hiking, boating and fishing within twenty minutes of most resident locations, as well as great restaurants and shopping in the town of Cashiers. Residents love their peaceful and tranquil setting.

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Holly Forest

Boasting country club living minus the country club price, Holly Forest (phases I - XIV) is a collection of subdivisions featuring affordable mountain homes, home sites and condominiums. It is the largest single-family and condominium community on the mountain. Residents of Holly Forest are granted access to the amenities of Wyndham Resort at Fairfield's Sapphire Valley. Holly Forest is located within a short drive to the unique shops, world-class dining and distinctive culture of the resort village of Cashiers.

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Lonesome Valley

With a history dating back to 1895, Lonesome Valley has served as a bastion to the great outdoors ever since Pittsburgh entrepreneur E.H. Jennings first acquired 35,000 acres near the sleepy village of Cashiers. Gracefully spanning the valley floor of the largest box canyon east of the Rockies, Lonesome Valley is said by many to be the place where Heaven and Earth meet. Today, with planned activities for residents and amenities such as community gatherings in The Farm House, recreation in The Sports Barn and relaxation at The Remote Spa, Lonesome Valley is anything but lonesome. Cottage and home designs pay homage to the Southern Appalachian farmhouses of a bygone era. Great care is given to preserving the history and natural setting that Lonesome Valley has become famous for.

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Spring Forest

Perched on the outermost edge of Cashiers overlooking the Sapphire Valley, Spring Forest is a distinctive gated community offering the best of luxury mountain living, along with panoramic vistas of the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. Many of the custom designed homes in this prestigious neighborhood are architectural masterpieces. Homes and lots offer incredible views over Panthertown National Forest, Sapphire Valley, and Bald Rock. Located just minutes to Sapphire and Cashiers, the convenience to so many activities, shopping, and restaurants, make Spring Forest a very desirable established community.

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Whisper Lake

With reflections of majestic pines on its surface, Whisper Lake quietly beckons residents of this waterfront community to kayak or canoe its pristine waters. Some homeowners in this small mountain community may elect to build within a stand of hardwood trees or with incomparable views of the mountain ridges seen for miles. Residents of the Whisper Lake subdivision are welcome to enjoy the wide variety of amenities of Wyndham Resort at Fairfield's Sapphire Valley, including golf, fitness center, tennis and much more.

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Spectacular Bald Rock and Sapphire Valley Views in Gated Cedar Hill

Sitting at a cool elevation in the premier gated community of Cedar Hill, this inviting, expansive home has fabulous views of Sapphire Valley and Bald Rock. Lots of natural light fills the spacious great room, which includes vaulted ceilings, a wood-burning fireplace, impressive windows, built-ins, and rich wood floors. The living room opens to the covered deck as well the dining room. The large kitchen is designed for creating culinary delights, and a breakfast bar gives guests a place to sit while chatting with the chef without interrupting the flow of cooking.

A master suite and guest bedroom are on the main level. Don't be afraid to invite the whole family over, because on the lower level are the family room, a second kitchen, and three additional bedroom suites, as well as a large deck. The upper level features another large bedroom with its own cozy sitting area.

Spectacular mountain and rock face views and a central location minutes to Cashiers and Sapphire make this a perfect seasonal retreat or year round home. It has been well-maintained and is move-in ready with great space for entertaining large or small groups. Your guests will be welcomed by the porte cochere and will also benefit from additional parking along West Rochester Drive. 

 

Cedar Hill

Situated between Cashiers and Sapphire Valley, Cedar Hill is an upscale gated community offering its residents awe-inspiring views and the very best in luxury mountain living. Whether searching for the latest in elegant mountain construction or a very special lot to call your own, Cedar Hill will not disappoint. An easy hike from your backdoor will lead you to the natural splendor of waterfalls set amongst a backdrop of hardwoods. Be one with nature, but enjoy the modern conveniences of underground utilities available to all home sites and a short drive into town.

Residents of Cedar Hill have access to all of the amenities of nearby Wyndham Resort at Fairfield Sapphire Valley, including golf, swimming, tennis, fitness and much more (see Sapphire Communities for more information).

 

Camp Merrie-Woode: Following the Gleam

If you’re lucky enough to live above Sapphire Valley’s Fairfield Lake, you’ve heard the mystical sounds that waft from the water’s edge on many summer nights. It could be, of course, the sounds of “Follow the Gleam,” Camp Merrie-Woode’s traditional final pageant. It could be the score from a musical performed by the campers in the drama program or just the voices of tired campers singing around the campfire.  Either way, it’s pure magic.
The campus itself is a jewel in the already-breathtaking Sapphire Valley of North Carolina. Founded in 1919 by Mabel “Dammie” Day, Marjorie Harrison, and Mary Turk, the camp pays homage to Dammie Day’s British roots with designations like King Arthur’s Court for the building that houses the gym and climbing wall. The Castle is home to the Merrie-Woode stage and theater classes, while Merlin’s Alderley Edge houses many of the summer staff. The infirmary, said to be staffed with the nicest nurses ever, is called Cloud 9 and the camp’s directors live in a beautiful home on the property called Tintagel, named for King Arthur’s father’s castle.
The current residents of Tintagel are Jim and Denice Dunn, who took the reins as directors in 2002.  The parents of two grown sons, they are now summer parents to hundreds of daughters and embody the enthusiastic culture which drives Camp Merrie-Woode.  Jim, formerly the headmaster of Summit Charter School in Cashiers, and Denice, a former engineer for General Electric, have been instrumental in Merrie-Woode’s participation in the wider community, by supporting a campership program, which provides funding for children with exemplary qualifications who otherwise would be unable to attend.  In addition, they have encouraged the use of the campgrounds during the off-season, welcoming after-school programs for the Boys and Girls Club of the Plateau as well as team-building activities for the New Century Scholars of Jackson County.
Celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2019, the 435-acre campground has welcomed girls from around the mountain and around the world, holding fast to its original charter to encourage the empowerment of girls and young women through physical, intellectual, and spiritual growth. It is, perhaps, more than coincidence that the camp opened its gates the same year that women won the right to vote.
The campers who are lucky enough to spend their summer days here are designated according to age, as pages, yeomen, squires, and knights. And, in another nod to Merrie-Woode’s British roots, the centerpiece of the entire camp experience is the production of “Follow the Gleam” which reenacts the story of King Arthur’s quest for the holy grail.   
The alumnae are a loyal sorority. Many return to the camp as counselors, board members, or for reunions.  Dorothy Moss Williams, a curator at the National Portrait Gallery who spent more than ten years at Merrie-Woode, convenes with ten camp friends each autumn in the camp’s guest lodge, which is available to rent. Merrie-Woode is also a desirable venue for weddings, although the camp holds to a strict policy requiring that the bride be an alumna. Additionally, only four weddings may be conducted on the property per year and never during camp weeks.  The wedding of a former camper has been booked well in advance for the day after the August closing of this season’s final session.
Mary Leland Davenport Hutchison, who attended Camp Merrie-Woode during the 1970s and 80s, recalls a camp fundraiser she attended many years ago when she lived in Atlanta.  Husbands were invited and one seasoned spouse stood up to tell the gentlemen gathered: “You have married into a cult and the sooner you pull out your checkbook, the better it will be for you.” The camp’s alumnae have been faithful supporters of various fundraising efforts over the years, making possible such things as the 2005 acquisition of land across Lake Fairfield opposite the camp, which was poised for real estate development. To honor the 100th anniversary, a capital campaign has been launched to fund an endowment, as well as attend to several capital improvements. Hutchison, whose daughter Jane has also been a camper, says that raising money for Merrie-Woode is easier than most causes because of the common heart of the alumnae. “The Merrie-Woode connection is neverending. It’s just second family.”
Camp Merrie-Woode’s program today has four major components, each of which the campers may experience throughout their stay.  They are boating, horseback riding, mountaineering, and drama.  In addition, the girls have a chance to choose classes in multiple other sports, as well as traditional art courses such as dance, ceramics, and painting.  Knitting has enjoyed a resurgence in popularity in recent years and is now part of the offering.  Depending on a girl’s interest, she can earn recognition in any of these disciplines through extensive study and practice over several summers.  One camper may pursue becoming a Horsemaster, for example, while another seeks to earn a King’s Player designation for drama.
Founded as a Christian camp, Merrie-Woode is nonetheless inclusive. All of the campers participate in daily devotionals, with various cabins taking turns in leading them, and a weekly chapel service is held every Sunday in the outdoor stone amphitheater.
Alumna Madeline Edwards, who today works as a journalist based in Beirut, Lebanon, remembers her experiences in the drama program beginning in 2005.  She recalls being named a King’s Player, the highest designation possible, and receiving the King’s Player necklace from her best friend at the honor ceremony.  Later, as a counselor, she was a ringleader for creative undertakings like decorating the dining hall for Harry Potter night.  Borrowing old wedding dresses from the costume shop and covering their faces with white face paint, she and the other counselors entertained the campers from the rafters. Her passion for drama was honed as she played the role of Anne Frank one summer and, another time, garnered the role of Mozart in a performance of Amadeus.  But despite these exceptional experiences, she concludes that her favorite memories were “just any downtime spent with my best friends.” Her grandmother, Nancy Edwards, adds, most emphatically, that Merrie-Woode made her the young woman she is today.

For others, the outdoor experiences inform their eventual life path. Holly Pierce Ambler, who lives in Boone, North Carolina, spent ten summers at  Merrie-Woode, as both a camper and later as a counselor.  She began as a very homesick ten-year-old, sending home several impassioned letters the first week, begging her parents to come get her.  But somewhere into the second week, the counselor who held her in her lap at the nightly campfire and the others who urged her to try outdoor activities turned the tide, and she was hooked.  She admits that prior to her camp experience she had very little outdoor experience, but the summers on Lake Fairfield were so influential that she eventually earned a college degree in outdoor experiential education.  Her first post-college job was as an instructor at the National Outdoor Leadership School. As is often the case, her aunt, sister, and cousins are also alumnae.
Sara Elizabeth Jackson, a sophomore at Auburn University, is returning this summer for the 11th time. It will be her third year as a counselor, an experience she has come to treasure even more than her time as a camper. She loves seeing the young campers return year after year, noting their development, and considers it a privilege to encourage and guide them.  She has become what is called the “Weaving Head” in the arts department and supervises campers as they make pillows and seats for chairs or stools at the camp.  A business administration major, she thinks her passion for this art has developed because it provides such a wonderful opportunity to get outside of her element.
Director Denice Dunn acknowledges that changing times have demanded adaptation.  One such change came a few years ago when the campus became “unplugged,” meaning no cell phones, no iPods, no computers.  The only exception is the iPod in each cabin which contains the music the girls have chosen to enjoy together during “downtime.”  However, earbuds are completely off limits and Denice confirms that as soon as the new rules took effect there was a noticeable increase in conversation and singing on hikes, on bus trips, and around the camp.
But many things have not changed. Uniforms are a tradition, and except for the substitution of shorts for bloomers, not a lot has changed over the past 100 years. It’s all part of a culture that encourages a young woman to throw on a uniform, pull her hair back into a ponytail, and get on with the joy of self-discovery, unencumbered.
Rudi Robbins Pillow, who attended camp for three years beginning in 1964, notes that today’s technical world has created an overly competitive environment for young people and cherishes the fact that Merrie-Woode is one of the few places where a girl has only to compete against herself.  She learned to love hiking and canoeing during her camp years and has memories of three-day hikes in the Smoky Mountains. Her three daughters attended Merrie-Woode, as have three granddaughters.  A resident of Killen, Alabama, she recalls a recent family wedding which was attended by six Merrie-Woode alumnae from all over the country.
This year, Denice confirms a wide geographic diversity will be once again represented, with campers from 38 different states and six countries. Over 140 people will be hired for staff positions, many of them former campers who are returning as counselors. The return rate is enviable and several full-time directors of the camp were at one time campers.
The camp’s centennial is a good excuse to look back at the vision of the three founders who wanted to offer young women a chance to explore their capabilities and challenge themselves in a nurturing environment.  That vision has become laser-focused as the years have passed.  Whether a girl’s dream is to hike Old Bald Mountain, sing her heart out in a musical lead, or earn a Captain’s Hat for accomplishment in the water, it will all be hers for the taking beginning this June, as a new century of campers follow the gleam. Girl power is clearly alive on the beautiful banks of Fairfield Lake.