Blog :: 08-2018

Enchanting Mountain Views in Private Chattooga Club

This cozy three bedroom, three bath Tudor-style Club Cottage is full of storybook charm, with enchanting views of Chimney Top and Rock Mountains in a lush setting. Features include poplar bark siding, wood interior walls and ceilings, marble bathrooms and fine finishes throughout. Enjoy the crisp air and beautiful scenery on the screened living porch with its own fireplace and room for dining. Conveniently located just steps away from all Chattooga Club amenities and minutes from downtown Cashiers, this carefree bungalow is the perfect getaway. Landscaping service is included with all Club Cottages.

 

Estate with Guest House and Mountain and Valley Views

Tranquil and picturesque long range vistas abound from this 22-acre Blue Valley estate in Highlands. Positioned at an elevation of 3,780 feet, the property features excellent privacy and incredible panoramic views of several mountain ranges, with layered ridges that turn a cool, misty blue in the distance.

Taking advantage of the beautiful surroundings, the main home offers several inviting outdoor living spaces for entertaining friends and extended family. To the front, a huge open deck makes the perfect place to savor morning coffee as the sun rises over Queen Mountain, the Satulah Mountains and the Small Fodder Stack Mountains beyond, plus several ranges in the Chattahoochee National Forest. On the terrace level, a large patio with a stone fireplace, built-in grill, putting green, horseshoe pit and shuffleboard court promises fun for all ages. The kitchen is completely remodeled and centrally located, while the newly added sunroom with wall-to-wall windows boasts a satellite kitchen with two dishwasher drawers and its own grilling porch. Three bedrooms, three baths, a living room, two dining areas, a playroom, den and two office spaces complete this 5,000+ square foot home. A whole house generator is included.

The guest cottage has one bedroom and one full bath, with an adorable kitchen, bonus room, half bath and rocking chair front porch. A large storage/equipment building sits nearby. With its own well and septic installed, the third home was purchased for additional acreage and is being sold as-is. It has gorgeous views looking over the Chattahoochee National Forest from the back of the house and Brushy Face and Little Yellow Mountains from the front.

Although only four miles from downtown Highlands, this spacious estate feels like a distant magical getaway. Sitting on top of the mountain plateau, it adjoins lush national forestlands filled with native flora, as well as deer, turkey, many species of birds and other wildlife.

Custom-Built Getaway with a Rustic Feel

Situated only minutes from Cashiers in the private High Meadows community, this custom-built getaway features the perfect blend of a mountain-inspired rustic feel with all the modern accouterments. Every detail was thoughtfully designed in this light and bright home, including Douglas fir posts and beams, shiplap wall coverings, and impressive exterior stonework.

The open concept floor plan keeps the chef in the conversation, whether the guests are in the dining room or living room. The main level also features ample sleeping arrangements with two guest bedrooms, as well as an expansive master suite with two walk-in closets, jetted soaking tub and access to one of the two open decks. Upstairs is another guest room with another living area plus a large bonus room that could be used as a home office or playroom. The huge plumbed and insulated basement could be converted into extra sleeping quarters or a home theater. A screened-in porch provides an inviting spot to cozy up, or venture outside to admire the lush landscaping and an adorable potting shed.

Bordered by the stunning beauty of the Nantahala National Forest, with crystal clear views of Whiteside, Terrapin, Sassafras and Black Rock Mountains, High Meadows of Cashiers serves as a quiet refuge for its residents. With community playing a central theme, a lovely pavilion with outdoor fireplace and picnic area is at the heart of High Meadows. It serves as a perfect gathering place for neighbors or special family events. A network of hiking trails run throughout the neighborhood—ideal for a morning hike, mountain biking, horseback riding or an evening stroll under starry skies.

 


 

 

Stylish Home with Lots of Charm in The Chattooga Club

This home offers a stylish setting inside the gates of the exclusive Chattooga Club. Five bedrooms and five baths provide plenty of room for guests. Located at the end of a quiet street with plenty of privacy, beautiful landscaping with indigenous plants surrounds the property.

The main level has two bedrooms, two baths and a grand living room with a gas fireplace. A covered deck with wood-burning fireplace boasts spectacular views of Chimneytop, Bald Rock, Hogback, Big Sheepcliff, Little Sheepcliff,  Shortoff, and Yellow Mountains. The upper level has two bedrooms, two baths, and a loft that could be used as a home office. The lower level consists of a large great room with full-sized wet bar and wine cellar, one bedroom and bath, a wood-burning fireplace plus an adjoining covered deck. Beautiful heart pine floors are throughout the whole house. The owner has taken wonderful care of this very special home.

The property is only a short walk to the Club and all amenities, including a picnic area overlooking Mac’s View and Lake Chattooga, which is stocked yearly for trout fishing. Membership to The Chattooga Club is by invitation only.

 

Community Spotlight: Falcon Ridge

 

A 290-acre limited development community in the Sapphire area of Western North Carolina, Falcon Ridge is designed to showcase luxury mountain homes in harmony with the mountain laurel, wildflowers, waterfalls, and wildlife that surrounds them. More than three-quarters of the community have been earmarked as green space, allowing for only 60 very special home sites within Falcon Ridge. At an elevation of 4,500 feet above sea level on Hogback Mountain, each home site allows for amazing views of the surrounding mountain range, the Sapphire Valley below and long range views stretching into parts of both North and South Carolina. Residents of Falcon Ridge enjoy mild temperatures year round, as well as a lovely three-acre meadow with community pavilion and outdoor bonfire ring on the property. Falcon Ridge homeowners are also granted access to the amenities of the Sapphire Valley Resort.

 

Community Spotlight: Bald Rock

Situated along the Eastern Continental Divide, bordered by the natural beauty of Panthertown Valley and adjacent to the prestigious Bald Rock community, The Divide at Bald Rock offers an eclectic blend of estate-sized home sites and cozy cabin lots. Encompassing 244 acres and set at elevations topping 4,500 feet above sea level, views from The Divide include cascading waterfalls, abundant foliage and awe-inspiring views of the mountains and valley floor. The Divide features an open-air pavilion for family and community gatherings, which includes a full kitchen and two stacked stone fireplaces. The equestrian center at Bald Rock is available to residents of The Divide, as are all of the amenities of the Sapphire Valley Resort, including golf, swimming, tennis and much more.

The Reach of Art: A Visit to the Bascom

Cross the covered wooden bridge just off Franklin Road in Highlands, and you will find yourself on the magical campus that is The Bascom.
Set on six lush acres of what was once Crane’s Horse Farm, this extraordinary center for the visual arts is a sensory treat for anyone who loves art.
You know you are somewhere special long before you walk through the door. To one’s right is the original horse barn which has been transformed into a ceramics center. The main building, designed by the Atlanta architectural firm of Lord Aeck Sargent, is composed of wood, glass, and stone to pay homage to the natural materials that are native to our part of the world.
A walking nature trail surrounds the campus, containing a variety of site-specific sculptures comfortably positioned among indigenous plants and flowers. An outdoor amphitheater, tiers defined by stone seating, is the perfect setting for weddings, classes, and guest lectures.
Like the warm hostess that she is, Teresa Osborn, meets me at the Center’s front door. As executive director, she quickly explains how she sees the Center’s three important missions: exhibition, education, and outreach. This is no hushed gallery of hands-off, “important” art—nor is it intended to be.
The exhibition aspect of the Center’s mission is everywhere you look, as the 30,000 square feet of space abound with remarkable pieces created by artists from the Southeast, many of whom call the Blue Ridge Mountains home. Oil paintings mix comfortably with photography and pottery, the occasional piece of primitive furniture and whimsical pieces like a room-size “tree” composed of discarded clothing. One can also find jewelry, basketry, and wood-turned vessels here. The collections are fluid so visitors can enjoy a totally unique experience each time they come.
A fun aspect of this art center is the opportunity for hands-on creativity. Check out the “smARTspace” loft on the third floor, and try any of many self-directed art activities. A “wishing tree” downstairs invites visitors to write their deepest desires on papers to hang from a tree. The wishes are as random as you would expect, from “I wish I was a horse” to “I wish I could destroy my computer and phone.” These two areas speak to Teresa’s deepest passion: that art be a unifier, accessible to all, regardless of income, ability, or anything else.
Education is unquestionably a big part of The Bascom’s mission as well. The Center offers artist residencies, fellowships and internships in ceramics, photography, sculpture and community, which is a teaching position involving outreach to all ages. Residencies range from two weeks to one year and afford artists housing, teaching opportunities, unlimited studio access, and the opportunity to sell their art.
The community at large is a huge focal part of the educational component, and an adult education calendar offers a palate-pleasing menu of everything from “Playing in the Clay” to “Highlands Landscape Photography.” In addition to after-school classes during the school year, area children (and visiting grandchildren) are invited to eight different art day camps in the summertime. Private lessons, too, are available for all ages through Art by Appointment.
“Outreach,” says Teresa, warming to a subject dear to her heart, “is a yearlong activity, diverse and widespread.” Area youth are served through school programs: the Boys and Girls Clubs, Big Brothers Big Sisters, and the Gordon Center for Children, to name just a few. The needs of our adult community are addressed through programs like those at Cashiers and Jackson County Senior Centers, the Center for Life Enrichment, the Chestnut Hill retirement community, and the Eckerd Living Center.
It is no small feat that admission to this visual feast is free. Thanks to year-long sponsors, such as Delta and The Chaparral Foundation, The Bascom is accessible to everyone. A robust membership lends further support, as do various sponsors of individual exhibits.
The vision for this Center began in the 1980s, when Watson Barratt’s estate made possible an exhibition space in the Hudson Library. Proceeds from the sale of his family home on Satulah Mountain founded The Bascom, which honors the maiden name of his wife, Louise Bascom Barratt. Although he died in 1962 when Highlands was still a village, his belief in the need for a permanent gallery was prescient. Today, more than 20,000 individuals visit The Bascom each year, and that does not include all those who learn and create at the Center, or the thousands of people who are enriched through the outreach programs.
A centerpiece of Teresa’s delightful, art-cluttered office, is a charming piece of decoupage, teeming with buttons and ribbons and miniatures, created by a gentleman who struggled with developmental challenges. His family, she says, was stunned and thrilled to see how much joy he gleaned from the compilation of this masterpiece, and she keeps it in a place of honor to remind her always, of the life-changing possibilities of art.
The Bascom’s ever-growing impact in the community is a living testament to Watson Barratt’s foresight and a gift to all of us who call these mountains home.

Whimsical Journey: Painting the Paint with Colorist Karen Weihs

When in the mountains, it’s easy to find yourself staring into the majestic vistas that surround you. You will feel something similar when viewing the abstract, contemporary oil paintings of Karen Weihs. 
Picasso once said, “Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.” For Karen, art is about creating imagery that allows the onlooker to formulate their own story, their own connection. Alluding to the familiar without giving the pieces away, she captures the essence of personal experience and reality to shape what the eyes see. 
In a magical blend of technique and tool, she paints a million stories of human experience on one canvas. Her skill is honed by palette knives and a selection of brushes that produce the glimmer of day by evening light. 
Weihs’ canvases are illuminated by intuition. Her mind may visualize a deer prancing deep within the forest while sun rays gently kiss the morning dew, yet it is the dance of her hand anticipating the next jab, carve, or smoothing technique that brings the deer to life. The impromptu maneuvers are the platform for the viewer to continue the journey of the story they see, perhaps recalling a past memory or looking toward a dream. 
“The magic happens and draws me in, and I find myself driven to capture and paint those responses over and over again,” says Karen. “It’s deeply gratifying. This erudition has earned me a confidence in looking for the cutting edge of paint technique, ever evolving to a higher standard. Usually the viewer can find something of the subject matter to relate to. This process allows me to tackle a subject that may or may not appear as my eyes see, painting the paint.” 
Her works radiate from the inside out, without attachment, separating her visualization from the journey another will take at its sight. Masterpieces meant to inspire, encourage, stimulate, or spark something from within another, whether that be dew on the earth, floating clouds, sunlight, leaves swaying in the treetops, or the piercing blank stare of a deer.
Karen and her husband moved to Cashiers from Charleston, South Carolina, where she was born and raised. Her private mountain home studio, Sunny Point Cottage, is both a working and teaching studio, offering half and full day retreats (private critiques and workshops) to encourage confidence and craft. The artist desires to help others find the best from within themselves, advising others to trust the process and their instincts.

Where can you view the art of Karen Weihs?

ALLISON SPROCK FINE ART
600 Queens Road
Charlotte, NC 
704-705-2000

B GALLERY AT THE BASCOM
Franklin Road
Highlands, NC 28778
828-526-4949

ELLA RICHARDSON FINE ART
58 Broad Street
Charleston, SC 29401
843-722-3660

GRAND BOHEMIAN HOTEL GALLERY
11 Boston Way, The Village at Biltmore
Asheville, NC 28805
828-398-5555

SUNNY POINT STUDIO, KAREN’S HOME, BY APPOINTMENT
889 Laurel Knob Road
Cashiers, NC 28717
828-226-4024

A Stroke of Timeless Tradition: The spirit of croquet is alive and well on the Plateau

One of America’s favorite backyard pastimes is one that distinguishes Cashiers and Highlands from many other mountain towns. What is it? Croquet. 
The traditional game played with wooden mallets and balls brings laughter and competition to the area known for its lush landscape of waterfalls and golf courses. From tournaments to weekly gatherings, summer on the green takes on a whole new meaning with over 1,600 croquet players in the highlands of Western North Carolina. 
It is a sociable spectacle where teams face off to hit a ball through a course of hoops or wickets (as Americans have named them). Croquet dates to the 1400s, but it didn’t become a recreational activity in the United States until the 1860s. The game turned into a tradition for many East Coast families, and has remained part of the lifestyle on the Highlands-Cashiers Plateau.
Despite its French name, croquet is very English. The polished appearance of the wisely dressed players and immaculate grass can be deceiving. Players must outwit their opponent(s), creating a slight dog-eat-dog aspect to the game. If you can manage to roquet, or hit a rival’s ball, you might gain a slight edge with gaining an extra shot. Strategy is the key, as you should consider not only your current shot, but the one after that and the one after that, making this game an authentic technical challenge. 
The classic game of croquet brings the community together for social events throughout the season. With clubs offering wine and wicket hours, it is common to see players sip their favorite vintage in between running a hoop. 

The Plateau offers a myriad of courts for the croquet-lover to choose:

The Chattooga Club is an East Coast croquet treasure with its world-class courts and facilities. Offering a nostalgic feeling of the early 1900s with its scenery and services, the club is postcard perfection. It is a United States Croquet Association (USCA) member club.

Cedar Creek Racquet Club is minutes from both Cashiers and Highlands with a course overlooking its lake. Down-to-earth in nature and perfect for a family-friendly escape, it’s named one of the top twenty tennis facilities in the country by World Tennis Magazine. 

Burlingame is nestled among the Blue Ridge Mountains and adjacent to the Horsepasture River. It is breathtakingly beautiful, and its croquet lawn is an integral part of member activities. It is a United States Croquet Association (USCA) member club.

The Country Club of Sapphire Valley is known for Wednesday Twilight Croquet, Friday Croquet Mixer, and Sunday Wine and Wickets. Prefer to watch? Take in the serene vista from the Mountain Verandah and watch the competitive spirit unfold. 
Highlands Country Club is distinctive with its Donald Ross designed golf course and unspoiled mountain landscape. Tuesdays and Thursdays play host to Wine and Wickets at this alluring, sociable croquet lawn. 

Cullasaja Club is known for its par-72 championship golf course designed by Arnold Palmer, as well as Ravenel Lake, and the cascading waters of the Cullasaja Rivers; however, the private club opened a full-size croquet court, The Lawn at Cullasaja, in 2013. 

Highland Falls Country Club is set amongst heart-stirring long-range views of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Enjoy the social game while breathing in fresh mountain air, or visit with friends on the croquet pavilion, which offers a wood-burning fireplace, wet bar, and washrooms.

Lake Toxaway Country Club is set amongst peaceful woodlands, offering a regulation-sized croquet lawn. With a 20-acre golf learning center, five Har-Tru tennis courts, and a private lake, this club is deeply rooted in scenic elegance. It is a United States Croquet Association (USCA) member club.

Trillium Links & Lake Club is the perfect lake escape in the Blue Ridge Mountains. It is a private residential, lake, and golf community known for wine and wickets each Monday and Thursday afternoon during the season. 

Tips to enhance your croquet game: Use a regular golf ball rather than a croquet ball when practicing. Keep your head down and make good contact in the ball, and take note of your swing. This will help you recognize how fast or hard you are hitting the ball, creating a more precise rhythm for your swing.