Things To Do

The Chattooga Club Events for August

8/2 - Speaker's Bureau: Kristy Woodson Harvey

8/7 - Burger & Game Night

8/9 - Fashion Show & Luncheon

8/9 - Speaker's Bureau: Dr. Howard Neufeld

8/10 - Pottery Class

8/15 - Mah Jongg Couples Night

8/17 - Chestnut Pool Dinner

8/21 - Burger & Game Night

8/22 - Dinner in the Garden

8/28 - Book Guild

8/30 - Iron Chef Chattooga

8/31 - Bow Wow Brunch

8/31 - Croquet & Cocktails for New Members

Hot Spot Day Trip

Even just twenty years ago, Greenville was far from cool.  Many described it as a decaying town with few job prospects and a waning population due in large part to the mass exodus of the textile industry in the 60s. Fast-forward to today and Greenville is on fire! It is not only a hot destination but also a vibrant and bustling city boasting a fast-growing population of almost 70,000. CNN Money has ranked Greenville as one of the Top 10 Fastest Growing Cities in the U.S. while in 2017 Condé Nast Traveler ranked it as one of the best small cities in America. The secret is out, making it a great time to plan a visit to Greenville now. 
Only an hour and a half drive from Cashiers and a little more from Highlands, Greenville makes an exciting day trip (or overnight) to experience all that this vivid city has to offer. Between their array of live music, historic sites, over one hundred restaurants, festivals, and outdoor fun, this is a small city with a fast pulse.
If you arrive early enough for breakfast, make your way to Biscuit Head for one of their specialty biscuits, like their decadent pulled pork, jalapeno pimento, bacon, poached egg, and maple syrup option. In keeping with southern tradition, their biscuits are the size of a cat’s head. This small breakfast/lunch chain based in Asheville makes you break any diet in a snap, but then again Greenville is not a place to go on a diet. It’s a foodie town.
Before even thinking about your next meal, work off that biscuit by walking or biking the Swamp Rabbit Trail, a 19.9-mile scenic path created on a historic rail bed. This well-maintained, paved trail offers gentle walks or easy rides along the Reedy River and through Falls Park, a 32-acre park that runs through downtown. One of the most photographed parks in all of South Carolina, Falls Park should not be missed with its abundant lush green spaces, scenic overlooks, botanicals, waterfalls, and the architecturally renowned suspension Liberty Bridge. For bike rentals, Reedy Rides, or Sunrift can set you up for just about any outdoor sport. For more active cyclists take the Swamp Rabbit all the way to Traveler’s Rest, a tiny town nine miles away, which was once a “resting spot for weary travelers” and home to several Indian tribes.
For guided excursions, there are tours for history buffs, food lovers, and adventurers. Greenville Glides offers a popular guided Segway tour, a refreshing way to see the sites. For baseball enthusiasts, the Greenville Drive, the Class-A affiliate of the Boston Red Sox, plays competitively at a downtown minor league ballpark resembling Boston’s Fenway Park where spectators lounge on picnic blankets. Greenville was home to legendary baseball player “Shoeless” Joe Jackson whose one-time residence is now a memorial library and small museum.
Greenville’s very walkable downtown has a charming Main Street area chock full of outdoor cafes, specialty stores, a historic district, museums, and even a zoo. Looking for a nostalgic place to shop with kids of all sizes, look no further than Mast General Store, which is a step back in time. For trendy home décor, Vintage Now Modern on South Main is a definite stop for one-of-kind items. A few miles off of Main, West Greenville Village is an area getting a total makeover with many eclectic boutiques, coffee houses, and artisan pop-ups. 
Greenville’s devotion to food is abundant with choices to fit all tastes, budgets, and occasions. When you are ready to break for food, a favorite eatery for a relaxing wine lunch is Le Passerelle, a casual French bistro located at the base of Liberty Bridge overlooking the Falls. For a lively culinary experience try J Rz, a family-style farm-to-table Greek restaurant. Craving a burger and a draft from one of the local breweries? Stop by the gastropub called Nose Dive. If a picnic is more your style or you want to pick up some culinary specialties for home, stop at Caviar & Bananas just off Main on North Laurens Street. Post lunch, and to settle your food coma, stroll to Methodical Coffee at 101 North Main or CR Tea off of South Main for an afternoon “pick me up.”
If you can stay into the night or overnight, catch a show at the Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre which hosts everything from ballet to plays to comedic and musical acts. Theater is nothing unless paired with dinner on the town, but with the culinary mega show going on in Greenville, the decision is a difficult one. A favorite among foodies is Husk, from the James Beard Award winner Chef Sean Brock (dinner only, closed Mondays), specializing in melt-in-your-mouth southern cuisine using local ingredients. Pre- or post-theater drinks are a must-do at either the rooftop bar of SIP Whiskey and Wine or go where the locals go for craft cocktails at Ink N Ivy. 
With so many enjoyable things to see and do in Greenville, if you should need trip planning advice for bigger groups or longer stays, professional companies like Tick Tock Concierge at ticktockconcierge.com will plan everything for you from soup to nuts. For day-tripping-made-easy, check out visitgreenvillesc.com for information on current events, festivals, retail and restaurant hours, and suggested itineraries. With moderate temperatures, Greenville is a year-round destination for playtime anytime with friends or family. •

Lunch off the Beaten Path

 

Journeying for lunch away from the 
familiar is a great way to learn about the area outside of your own backyard. While taking in the fresh, cool mountain air on your drive, you will come across spectacular scenery no matter which direction you venture. We have put together our top ten most interesting list of eateries with many being within an hour drive from the Highlands-Cashiers Plateau. As you meander toward your destination, take in the spectrum of color, the diverse terrain, and explore a bigger playground. Happy eating!

// Rizzo’s Bakery & Bistro
91 Georgia Road, Franklin, NC
Lunch Thursday-Saturday 10 am to 3 pm
rizzosbakeryandbistro.com, 828-369-7774

One of the closest destination lunch spots on our list, Rizzo’s is well known for their daily homemade breads and custom cakes, and most recently their mouthwatering lunch. With a daily changing menu, attention to detail is obvious with their creative use of locally sourced, seasonal ingredients. Make sure to save room for dessert!

We recommend: Baked In-House Tomato Tart or Quiche //Applewood Smoked Ham & Brie Cheese Paris Sandwich //
Barbara’s Meatloaf Sandwich

// Fortify
69 North Main Street, Clayton, GA
Lunch served Wednesday-Saturday 11:30 am -2:30 pm
fortifyclayton.com, 706-782-0050

Since the opening of Fortify in 2014, Clayton has never been the same. The dining scene was suddenly elevated by the partnership between award-winning Chef Jamie Allred and the seasoned restaurant manager Jack Nolan who teamed up to bring an inspiring new restaurant concept to town. Using sustainable practices by supporting local farms, this farm-to-table bistro offers New American fare in a hip, relaxed setting in the revitalized downtown of Clayton. With the success of Fortify, the owners seized the opportunity to grow into the next-door space with Fortify Pi, a gourmet pizza pub.

We recommend: Gouda Fritters // Fortify Reuben // Fried Oyster Plate

// Lake Rabun Hotel & Restaurant
35 Andrea Lane, Lakemont, GA
Open April-October for Sunday Brunch only 11 am- 3 pm
Reservations recommended
lakerabunhotel.com, 706-782-4946

A beautiful country road will take you around the magnificent Lake Rabun to find this well-hidden dining spot. While the historic hotel dating back to 1922 is interesting enough in itself, the superb restaurant is a recipient of several awards. Claiming to have started the farm-to-table movement in the area, the kitchen works with local farmers to bring the freshest of seasonal ingredients to their guests. Their adventurous cuisine is a fusion of American Southern with influences from France and the Middle East. On a nice day, ask for a table on the porch to sit under a canopy of trees and get a small view of the lake.

We recommend: Southern-Style Crab Oscar // Low Country Shrimp & Grits // Smoked Local Rainbow Trout Rillettes

// Fire & Water at Fire Mountain
700 Happy Hill Road, Scaly Mountain, NC
Open to the public seasonally for lunch only (call for hours)
Reservations required at least 48 hours in advance
firemt.com, 828-526-4446

Upon finding this magical spot just south of Scaly Mountain just off Route 106, you will be surprised you didn’t know about this well-kept secret. Opening as an inn some twenty years ago, a recent million-dollar renovation of the property allowed the owners to add a state-of-the-art kitchen, indoor/outdoor restaurant, and a chic water feature that breathes fire. The mountain views from this elevated plateau are spectacular. The ingredients are fresh and creative with all menu items sourced from their own backyard. It is nothing short of a peaceful, relaxed dining experience.

We recommend: Salmon Niçoise Salad // Vegetarian Club // Chocolate Mocha Icebox Cake

// Belle’s Bistro @ Chattooga 
Bell Farms 
454 Damascus Church Rd, Long Creek, SC
Open March 30-December, Tuesday-Sunday 11 am -2 pm
chattoogabellefarm.com/farm/belles-bistro, 864-647-9768

Along the Chattooga River at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains, this 138-acre working farm is set in a historic area of South Carolina that was the largest apple-producing area east of the Mississippi in the 1950s. Belle’s treats you to a diverse menu of farm-fresh local ingredients in a unique spot to gaze out at rolling hills, fruit orchards, and green pasture. After lunch, visit their distillery and pick some of the many varieties of fruit from their trees to take home.

We recommend: Bacon Herb Burger // Portabella with Cilantro Walnut Pesto on Ciabatta // Roast Turkey with Apple (from their farm) with Pesto on Ciabatta

// The Phoenix & The Fox
14 S. Gaston St., Brevard, NC
Lunch/Brunch Monday-Sunday 11 am- 3 pm
thephoenixandthefox.com, 828-877-3232

The restaurant movement of farm-to-table and locally sourced ingredients is also a big part of this American gastropub’s mission. Executive Chef Miles Hogsed offers inspiring organic menu items from local farms and many vegetarian options. Unique craft beers and cocktails also flow freely from the bar. 

We recommend: Classic Crab Hushpuppies // Apple, Bacon, & Brie Burger // Shrimp & Grits

// Frog Leap Public House 
44 Church Street, Waynesville, NC
Lunch/Brunch served Saturday and Sunday only 11am-3pm
Reservations recommended
frogsleappublichouse.com, 828-456-1930

Finding a good restaurant in the bustling town of Waynesville is not difficult, but this eatery stands above the rest with its inspiring Southern menu that changes daily. Executive chef and owner Kaign Raymond says, “We prepare everything from scratch and use local products in our bar and kitchen every day of the year to produce innovative, but simple interpretations of traditional Appalachian dishes.” Enough said.

We recommend: Butternut Squash, Chard, Chipotle Quesadillas // House Smoked Pulled Pork Sliders // Devils on Horseback

// Guadalupe Café
606 W. Main Street, Sylva, NC
Lunch served Tuesday-Sunday 11:30 am
guadalupecafe.com, 828-586-9877

This casual, vintage style dining spot calls its food “Caribbean-inspired fusion cuisine.” Of course, it too is sustainable and farm-to-table, but out of all of our restaurant recommendations, this one offers the most unique menu choices including many vegan and vegetarian options. From tapas to entrees, their menu has something for everyone and even allows diners to customize their own quesadillas, burritos, and nachos.

We recommend: Curry Bowl // Huevos Rancheros // Pulled Pork and Dark Cove Goat Cheese Tacos

// The Bistro at the Everett Hotel
24 Everett Street, Bryson City, NC
Brunch only; Saturday and Sundays 8:30am-3pm
Reservations strongly recommended
theeveretthotel.com, 828-488-1934

With a philosophy of “Eat with Integrity-Live with Gratitude”, the Cork & Bean Bistro, simply known as The Bistro, wants you to have a dining experience that engages all of your senses. The chef strives for food that is organic, local and seasonal while being influenced by traditional Southern cuisine. 

We recommend: Eggs Benedict // Breakfast Crepe // Pimento Cheese BLT

// Pisgah Inn
on the Blue Ridge Parkway, Mount Pisgah, Milepost 408
Open April-October, lunch 11:30 am- 4 pm
First come, first served, so go on “off” times
pisgahinn.com, 828-235-8228

The furthest of all of our lunch spots (a good hour and a half trip), this historic inn sits on property once owned by the Clinghams followed by the Vanderbilts at an elevation of 5,000 feet on top of Mount Pisgah. It opened as an inn in 1919 as a resting spot for weary travelers. Sitting majestically just off of the BRP (that’s the Blue Ridge Parkway for newbies), the Pisgah Inn calls itself “A window on the world.” Often it’s crowded and you’ll wait for a table, especially on the weekends, but there is a reason people go-the view! It is worth the drive.

We recommend: Walnut Crusted Mountain Trout // Mountain Fried Chicken //Blue Ridge Mountain Beet Salad •

A Good Walk Spoiled: A Self-Proclaimed Duffer Continues Her Golf Struggle

By all rights, I should have given up the game of golf years ago. There was the time, in the beginning, when I dutifully followed my husband to the practice range and proceeded to hit every golf ball in my bag with robotic precision. It was only as I swung at the last one that I noticed the huge baskets of range balls provided beside me.
There was the time I unknowingly wore a pair of my husband's many golf shoes that I had nervously pulled from the trunk of our car upon arriving at a friend's course. It was maybe on the second hole when I noticed I was sliding a bit in my backswing and I was too embarrassed to say a thing. Note to self: I can play a full round in a pair of men's size 10 shoes, though not very well.
Perhaps I should have hung it up when I got a big laugh from my foursome when I asked my young caddy for my “five arm,” or the day I discovered that my 51 handicap was the highest of all the women in our club, including one extraordinary lady who happened to be legally blind.
Why, 35-plus years into my golf odyssey, do I continue the struggle? Quite simply, I live on this beautiful plateau in the Blue Ridge Mountains and giving up the game would be like cutting off the proverbial nose to spite my face.
It's not enough that drop-dead vistas of waterfalls, craggy mountains, lakes, and streams gift wrap each one of the public and private golf courses in the Cashiers-Highlands area. It's the rare place where you can ask a good golfer (of hole-in-one stature) to name her favorite hole, and she chooses a particular one because of the breathtaking flowers planted around the green.
It's the place where Justin Thomas can break the course record at Mountaintop Golf and Lake Club one day, shooting a 64, and a University of Alabama sophomore, Robbie Shelton, can go out the next day and shoot a 61, according to Micah Hicks, the private club's director of golf. He also remembers the Bryan Brothers (George and Wesley) agreeing to caddy for the club's member/guest tournament and using the time up here to shoot a trick shot video at Mountaintop and Old Edwards Club. The video went viral on YouTube, raising enough money for Wesley to go on tour, where last year he won the RBC Heritage championship.
There is a laid-back culture in this mountain air that attracts players of all levels. Tom Fazio, who is renowned as the golf course architect of more than 120 courses worldwide, is a part-time resident of western Carolina and a frequent local player. The designer of both the Mountaintop and Wade Hampton golf courses, he and his wife are partial to Mountaintop which allows family dogs to ride along on a round. Their dog Maggy frequently accompanies them and avails herself of the dog treats that are available at the course's comfort stations.
The setting here allows golfers to get up close and personal with all sorts of wildlife as well. Golfers at the Country Club of Sapphire Valley remember the year that a mother bear and her cubs took up residence in a covered cart bridge on the sixth hole. After several heart-stopping encounters with golfers, the mama bear was “nudged” to a more remote area by a team of maintenance staffers. 
For years, there were sightings of a three-legged bear called “Tripod” by the locals, and area golfers experience the occasional sightings of deer, bobcats, and turkeys. A sun-worshipping garter snake hung out on the same drainage pipe day after day one season, to the point that he came to be known as Freddie.
People like me, as well as the good golfers, find pleasure in the “good walk spoiled” as John Feinstein famously wrote in his book of the same name.
For someone new to the Plateau, there are numerous golf venues. The immediate area features 15 golf courses, three of which are public. The public courses are all different but together can provide an overview of the special nature of mountain golf.
v The oldest is High Hampton, recently purchased by Daniel Communities, which is planning an extensive upgrade of the golf course-among other major improvements. A fun local legend explains the fact that for years the golf course had only 11 holes. The story goes that a previous owner, E.L. McKee, got the bill for those first 11 holes, was shocked by it, and cut off the project there. It would be decades before the other seven holes were added. High Hampton boasts some recent color, too, as the television version of the classic Dirty Dancing was filmed there in 2016, and many people on the staff were enlisted as extras.
v Sapphire National Country Club offers a true traditional mountain golf experience. Rated four and-a-half stars by Golf Digest, the course showcases mountains, valleys, and waterfalls and a memorable fifteenth hole island green.
v For a real change of pace, check out the Red Bird Links in Sapphire Valley. An executive course, which consists of six par three holes and three par fours, it's a great course for beginners as well as more seasoned players interested in polishing a short game. A weekly golf clinic is available during season, as well as a junior golf program, and the winter finds the course used for “foot golf,” a family-friendly game utilizing soccer balls.
Like all golfing paradises, there are funny stories in those majestic mountains, another factor that keeps people like me coming back. One full-time resident, who has been know to tee it up on “mild” days in January, recalls an older gentleman who loved the game and had, in fact, “shot his age” several times. On one memorable outing, everyone drove onto the fairway from the tee box to hit their second shots. The gentleman struggled to find his ball, temporarily stopping the play, until he remembered that he hadn't hit a tee shot.
There are countless stories of determined golfers falling into water in search of errant golf balls. What these stories all seem to have in common is white pants. I also heard the story of one friend trying to help another who had fallen into a pond, only to fall in himself for a double-whammy.
Water, of course, is a huge component of the mountain golf scene, to the extent that one local golfer walks a course early some mornings, retrieving lost underwater balls as he goes. He donates his considerable yield to the First Tee Foundation which promotes values like integrity and perseverance in young golfers, a comforting thought to golfers like me who have left many a ball behind in the water.
Then there was a gentleman from Japan who had very limited experience with the game. His host explained that the containers of sand on the cart were for divots. At the end of the round, the host discovered that his guest had carefully placed each and every divot he made into the container.
As I write these stories, I'm beginning to feel better about my golf game. Did I mention the time I won a nine-holer season championship, only to be informed, post-award ceremony, that I had not played enough rounds to qualify? I can't make this up, but my Waterford bowl prize was taken away and handed to the second-place winner as I sipped my celebratory champagne. 
And still, as long as I live in this beautiful place, I can't find the heart to quit. Nine and dine anyone?

The Nirvana of Fly Fishing

The mountains of western North Carolina lure those far and wide seeking higher elevations, stunning views, waterfalls, and verdant forests. However, it is the copious streams, creeks, and rivers lying within these mountains that draw fly fishermen of all levels and skills, year-round. North Carolina’s waterways are abundant with wild or stocked rainbow, brown, and brook trout, as well as smallmouth bass in midsummer.

When asked what attracts them to the sport, many fly fishermen find it hard to put into simple terms. The collective agrees there is no easy formula in making “the catch,” for an angler is challenged before even stepping into the water. The sport requires thought, instinct, and strategy. Great consideration goes into understanding the fish on that particular day, on that particular stream, since it varies day-to-day, stream-to-stream, season-to-season. Sometimes it varies hour-to-hour. One must consider the fish’s relationship with its environment, the weather, water temperature, level, and current. The answers are key in crafting a cunning approach to the day’s journey.

“There is an art to fly fishing,” according to Ben Elmer, an avid fisherman, prominent local guide and manager at Brookings Anglers in Highlands. “The draw for me comes with chasing the fish and convincing them to eat my fly.” With tens of thousands of artificial flies to consider, wisely choosing a fly that best matches the current bug hatch creates a greater opportunity for this to happen. Equally as important to an aspiring fish catcher is mastering casting techniques where the fly mimics the actual habits of the “bug du jour.”

Elmer describes the scene on the river. An angler first strategically scopes out an ideal location where the fish might be found. He then chooses his fly, not just any fly, the right fly that will tempt the fish. After quietly wading into the water, he fortifies his stance, chooses his cast, and delivers his fly. Patiently he waits. Feeling camaraderie with nature and perhaps his fellow fisher friends nearby, he enjoys the whip and grace of his cast as his fly dances on the surface. There is no impatience in the wait as the rewards are great, and then suddenly, possibly many casts later, STRIKE! He hooks one. A rush of adrenaline courses through his veins as he works to keep the trout or bass on the line. His skill at properly setting the hook will hopefully secure the catch as the duel plays out. However, stalking and catching the fish is only part of the game. “It is not over until the fish is successfully in the net,” says Elmer, “and that is a challenge in itself.”

Gail Bell, a ten-year veteran fly fisherwoman from Scaly Mountain, North Carolina says, “Fish are spooky and smart. Stealthiness is always your mantra. Imagine, now the fish has his choice from tens of thousands of natural food floating by. What are the odds he will choose your artificial fly? But when he does ... POW ... lights out awesomeness! It can be spiritual and technical with a little luck thrown in.”

“You don’t have to catch a fish though to have a good time,” Elmer shares like a secret. Fishermen vary in the experiences they seek. Some choose to float rather than wade, some want private over public waters, and some prefer to fish in the quiet winter months when they can take their catch home. Finding a peaceful experience grounded in nature is ideal for some who want to “get away from it all,” while others seek the thrill of the chase.

American author Norman MacLean who wrote A River Runs Through It equates fly fishing to a piece of music that slowly builds to an exciting crescendo. Maybe this metaphor best explains the growth of the sport and its captive audience of all genders and ages. Regarded as being meditative and therapeutic, restorative fly fishing retreats are plentiful and hosted by groups such as Casting Carolinas for cancer survivors and Project Healing Waters for military personnel and disabled veterans.

Brookings Anglers, with locations in Cashiers and Highlands, is a trustworthy resource for finding the best experience. Their guided trips are a terrific way to learn, grow, and perfect techniques. In addition, they offer fly-tying courses, licenses, and full or half-day packages for individuals, couples, and groups. Packages start at $200.

Highlands Motoring Festival

 

Longing to have a close-up encounter with a coveted Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing worth somewhere to the tune of two million dollars? Look no further than in your backyard to experience such a rare moment. At the Highlands Motoring Festival in Highlands, North Carolina, you never know which spectacular collectible car will take your breath away. This festival draws a sophisticated group of car collectors who showcase their pride and joy and give you the opportunity to admire and inquire. So, rev your engines and mark your calendars for this year’s Festival, an extraordinary weekend of unforgettable cars, community,  and camaraderie. 


Touted as the “Festival with an Altitude,” the Highlands Motoring Festival (HMF) is proud to shout from the Blue Ridge Mountains that it is the highest motoring festival east of the Rockies. Celebrating its twelfth year, this rapidly-growing, family-friendly event attracts car collectors, enthusiasts, and the curious. This June, it is expecting around 3,500 attendees from across the nation, including 125 car owners for Saturday’s main judging event, “Cars in the Park.” 


The vision behind the Highlands Motoring Festival is to produce a unique educational and social car event, creating a fundraising platform to give back to the community. With most car shows charging a hefty entrance fee, this festival is free to the public, making it even more special as a gift to the community. According to the motoring festival spokesman Steve Ham, “It is exciting to think that an open-to-the-public event like this could inspire someone to start collecting. It is a spectacular opportunity to celebrate the history of the automobile and experience many rare and exotic cars in one place.”


The HMF weekend is chock full of daily events, from “Monte Carlo Night” to a scenic 160-mile technical driving rally called “One Lap of the Mountains” to the grand event, “Cars in the Park,” where a judging competition takes place. Trophies created by a local artist will be awarded to cars designated as Best in Class and Outstanding in Class. This year’s competition registration is already filling up with collectible sports cars like the 1966 Chevrolet Corvette and 1967 Porsche 912 making their inaugural trip to Highlands. Showcased at this year’s festival is an exciting new class of vintage racing cars with an established racing history in famous races such as Le Mans and the Daytona 500.


The level of sophistication of this regional car show is quite evident by the impressive competition. Remarkable past entries include a 1926 Model T and the most unusual of entries, the Amphicar, which operates as both a car and a boat. Copious touring models and high-performance cars are also present. In the case of the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing, there was not only one at the show a couple of years ago, but three! Entrants are judged in eight different classes with an awards ceremony to follow. The car owners have gone to great monetary and physical lengths to restore and prepare their cars for show. 


Fundraising dollars are raised through Platinum sponsors like Mercedes, Porsche, Ferrari, and BMW, as well as important local supporters, ticket sales, donations, and registration fees. All net proceeds from the HMF go to charity with this year’s event serving three beneficiaries: The Literacy Council, which endeavors to advance lifelong learning and a knowledgeable community; R.E.A.C.H., whose mission is to prevent family violence in all its forms; and the Community Care Clinic, which provides free medical services to the needy.


If you have a pre-1990 collectible car you would like to register for the Saturday, June 8th competition, go to highlandsmotoringfestival.com. If you want to feel like you are walking onto a James Bond movie set, make a plan to attend any one of the weekend events. The pulse and enthusiasm of this unique class of people and cars is something you don’t want to miss.

Monte Carlo Night
THURSDAY NIGHT, June 6

A high-stakes “gambling-for-good” fundraiser that kicks off the weekend hosted by Highlands Falls Country Club. Expect game tables, hors-d’oeuvres, cocktails, exotic cars, a live auction, and chances to win lots of “play money.” Cost per ticket: $75.

One Lap of the Mountains
FRIDAY DAY, June 7

In its sixth year, this popular road rally is an adventure of a lifetime, giving participants an opportunity to explore a bespoke curvy route through the countryside. A technical rally rather than a timed rally, the event allows participants to meander 160 miles as a group over paved rural roads taking in vast mountain vistas, lush forests, waterfalls, pastures, historic landmarks, flora and fauna, and a multitude of lakes and babbling brooks. Passing road markers like Happy Place Lane and following detailed maps with directional cues such as “take a left at the hound dog by the red mailbox” make the route even more interesting and fun for drivers and their passengers. The lap begins at 9 am and ends at 3 pm with a stop for lunch along the way. Only a max of 40 cars are allowed. Register now so you don’t miss this special event. Cost per vehicle: $125 (includes one passenger).

Welcome Party at High Dive
FRIDAY NIGHT, June 7

An evening meet and greet at Highlands’ newest watering hole, from 6 pm to 8 pm for all “gear heads” (that’s industry talk for car enthusiasts). Free to participate. No registration required.


The Main Event: 
Cars in the Park
SATURDAY, June 8

This classic car show with a judging competition takes place in the heart of Highlands at the Kelsey-Hutchinson Founders Park beginning at 11 am. Entrance is free for all spectators, but donations are greatly appreciated to benefit three local charities. Competition cars are judged and awarded Best of Class in the following car classes: Touring, Classic, Street Rod and Custom, American Sport and High Performance, Foreign Sport, Foreign Classic, and Trucks/Utilities. This year’s special interest class is Vintage Racing Cars, requiring a racing background in such prestigious and varied venues as Le Mans, Indianapolis, Daytona, Monte Carlo, etc. Competition entry cost: $35.

After the car show ends at 4 pm, “Music in the Park” will round out the night beginning at 6 pm. Free to the public.

Cars and Coffee
SUNDAY, June 9

Located in Wright Square, this casual morning send-off at 8:00 am allows participants and spectators alike to gather one last time, relive the weekend, and make future plans. Free to participate. No registration required. •

 

Bald Rock 2019 Season

May 25 - Memorial Day Dinner

June 10 - Mule Ride and Party

June 15 - Pavilion Dinner

July 6 - Independence Day Celebration / Pavilion Dinner

July 15 - Mule Ride and Party

August 3 - Pavilion Dinner

August 19 - Mule Ride and Party

August 31 - Labor Day Celebration / Pavilion Dinner

September 9 - Mule Ride and Party

September 21 - Pavilion Dinner

October 5 - Chili / Fall Celebration / Pavilion Dinner

The Craft Beer Revolution

The godfather of Asheville craft beer, Oscar Wong, opened Highland Brewery in 1994 in the basement of Barley’s taproom. Passion for his hobby led to the tourism and craft that has earned Asheville national accolades of “Beer City USA” many times since 2009. Today, with more breweries per capita than any other city, this area is a craft beer lover’s paradise. From hoppy IPAs to dark stouts and every taste you can imagine, where can you find craft beer to taste and enjoy on an afternoon in Asheville? Everywhere, but we’ve got the guide to match both your palate and style. 

  

1 Sierra Nevada - Located near the Asheville airport, it is the perfect stop—pre or post flight. With a Jackson Hole style lodge look, this national brewery is coming onto the scene big time in Mills River, NC. With 23 beers on tap, their selection of craft brew is a force to be reckoned with, and their small plates and farm-to-table culinary menu options include the sinfully engaging duck fat fries. Don’t miss a chance to do some sitting by the fire outdoors, listen to live music at the amphitheater, or stroll the Mills River Estate Garden.

sierranevada.com/brewery/north-carolina

 

Burial Beer - This local favorite in the South Slope of Asheville has a mysterious vibe. Its name suggests something morbid, yet the art surrounding their selection of beer is a celebration of life, the harvest, and what is to come. The name matches their taproom, the low lighting and unfelt dampness of the earth inside leads to a sunny patio to toast your friends. It is one of the “it” spots, and the brew is good. 

burialbeer.com/taproom

 

Wicked Weed - This is a tourist trap, yet well worth a visit. Since opening in 2015 with their West Coast style of brewing, it has become known for labels such as Pernicious IPA, Lunatic Belgian Blonde, and a portfolio of barrel-aged sour and farmhouse ales. The hot spot was recently purchased by Anheuser-Busch in an effort to tap into the increasing popularity of craft beer. The brewery also offers a small, tasty menu, which can be helpful when indulging in some of their high gravity beers.

wickedweedbrewing.com

 

New Belgium - The Colorado-based brewery opened its Asheville location in 2015 with a conscious, sustainable craft beer business model. The space has a California industrial feel paired with a grass-roots vibe. Nestled next to the French Broad River off of Craven Street, the tasting room offers an outdoor park for kids, dogs, and outdoor games. Register online for the 90-minute tour of the facility prior to visiting if you want to learn more about their process. Food trucks are on location, as the taproom serves beer only. 

newbelgium.com/Brewery/asheville/tasting-room

 

Highland Brewing Company - The first craft brewer of Asheville, is also the largest family-owned brewery in the Southeast. Named after the Scots Irish who settled in these Appalachian Mountains in the 18th and 19th century, the brewery is a legend in North Carolina. Located approximately ten minutes from downtown Asheville, the brewery offers a rooftop, outdoor venue location and large taproom that is used to host many non-profit events. I recommend the Highland Gaelic Ale, and Cold Mountain (winter seasonal) on tap.

highlandbrewing.com

 

Oskar Blues - Close to the plateau, you’ll find Oskar Blues in Brevard. Its funky atmosphere accompanies its most recognized label, Dale’s Pale Ale. Located 10 minutes away from Pisgah National Forest, it is a popular stop for bikers and hikers. Hungry? The CHUBwagon serves tacos and CHUBburgers.

oskarblues.com/breweries/brevard

 

Satulah Mountains - Of course, we can’t go without mentioning our neighborhood brewer - Satulah. East of downtown Highlands, this quaint spot offers great live music and a down to earth atmosphere. satulahmountainbrewing.com

 

It used to be that only the sophisticated, geek beer drinker enjoyed and explored the crafts. Now more favored by the average beer consumer and tourist, the craft beer industry is on the rise across the nation. Here in Western North Carolina, there is an app for that. Dedicated to all things craft beer in Western North Carolina, the Asheville Ale Trail is your guide for craft beer destinations and current happenings. Download the Ale Trail App here - ashevillealetrail.com

Raise a glass, because our region’s beer is some of the best! 

Old-Fashioned Family Fun

Trending today is the idea of strengthening the family bond by sharing more memorable and meaningful moments together. Families are increasingly electing to put down their smartphones and turn off their televisions in order to find group activities away from screens. In the new year, if you and your family resolve to find quality time together then the Highlands-Cashiers Plateau has several terrific options to enjoy good old-fashioned family fun outdoors. The small town of Highlands, surrounded by national forest and nestled in the mountains at 4118’ in elevation, may appear like something out of a Norman Rockwell painting. The town plan lays out ideally for visitors and residents alike to easily walk the sidewalks and enjoy the quaint shops and plentiful restaurants, or sit on a bench to watch the world go by (perhaps with an ice cream cone in hand). Steepled churches, rhododendron walkways, and front porches adorned with rocking chairs make for a handsome picture-perfect postcard. Adding to the charm and character of the town is the newly opened ice skating rink that draws more families to experience the fresh air and find fun on the ice. Sandwiched between Main Street and Kelsey-Hutchinson Founders Park, the town green space named after Samuel Hutchinson and Clinton Kelsey who founded Highlands in 1875, the state-of-the-art rink was a gift to the town by Art and Angela Williams of Old Edwards Inn and Spa. Open from November to March, Thursday through Tuesday, the ice rink entices people from families to singles to wrap themselves in fleece and don their skates. People of all ages take to the ice amid gleeful faces and peals of laughter. While lively background music plays, you’ll see some young and old holding hands, solo skaters finding their own magic, and observers on the sidelines snapping photos of loved ones and sipping hot chocolates. While there is the option to use your own skates, the $5 entrance fee includes skates, making it an affordable form of entertainment. And for those with more limited skating abilities, plastic Skate Helpers are available to assist in keeping everyone upright on the ice. One visiting Atlanta family staying in town was thrilled to find amusement of this kind for their five kids ranging in age from 5 to 13. They loved the accessibility of the rink and the beauty of its surroundings. While the rink hosts birthday parties, after-school gatherings, and events, “date night” has become popular on Friday and Saturday nights when the rink remains open late. No matter who is on the ice, bliss and delight seem to be a common theme. If you need to be outfitted for chilly weather, go to Highland Hiker in Cashiers or Highlands to find the best brands in outdoor apparel. Around town or at the rink, you may just run into an old-timer who recalls many years past when ice skating on local lakes was commonplace. Neighbors and families would gather to enjoy a good skate, but not before shoveling lots of snow off the ice. Times have changed because winters are not as cold as they once were, but this area is fortunate to have two manmade rinks on the Highlands-Cashiers Plateau, along with other outdoor sport offerings for you and your family. With the summer crowds gone, winter is a perfect time to enjoy the beauty this area holds. Don’t let time skate by before you and yours find some adventure on the ice.

A Mountain Christmas

Christmas on the Plateau is much more than a single day or a week. It seems to begin the moment one pushes away from the Thanksgiving table.

Be sure to check out the Highlands ice-skating rink which will be open extra hours during the Christmas holidays. The charge to use the rink is just $5 and ice skates are provided.  For more information regarding the holiday schedule, call the Highlands Recreation Department at 828-526-3556.


With the lighting of these community Christmas trees and the season's kick-off comes thoughts of a tree for one's own home. There is no better place to find a live tree than here in Western Carolina, where Christmas tree farms are a cottage industry. Our region's elevation, excellent soil, and well-dispersed rainfall contribute to its deserved reputation as a reliable source for Christmas trees.


A perfect place to visit is the 80-acre Tom Sawyer's Tree Farm in Glenville, where families can choose and cut their own Fraser Fir trees, measuring from three to twelve feet. While the tree is being packed to take home, visitors can check out the farm's charming village populated with Christmas elves, a craft tent for creating Christmas art, and a storytelling room. Move to the big red barn for food, drink, and evergreen selections, participate in a scavenger hunt and then drop off letters to Santa at his own post office. A ride in a horse-drawn carriage can round out a memorable experience. Tom Sawyer's is open through the season until Christmas Eve for people arriving to the mountains later in December. Please note, because of his busy schedule in December, Santa will only be at the farm on weekends.


Of course, you could choose to create a truly indelible family memory with the “Christmas Tree Package” from Old Edwards Inn in Highlands, the luxury hotel which is included on the National Register of Historic Places. Spend one night, enjoy dinner at Madison's, and take in such family-friendly amenities as popcorn, holiday movies, and games in the Kelsey Game and Theater Room. You can even ask an elf to come to your room to tuck in the children. Awake the next morning and drive to a local tree farm with a voucher for a five-to-six-foot Christmas tree. Now that's a holiday kick-off!


The month-long celebration continues the following week with Highlands' Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, Saturday, December 1 at 11 a.m. This tradition draws participation by area marching bands and school groups and boasts a live nativity scene including real camels, the Mountain Garden Club Dancing Ladies and, of course, Santa Claus. Small children are encouraged to bring bags for the candy that is distributed from the various floats. The merchants in Highlands will be competing in a holiday window decorating contest, making Main Street and surrounding streets perfect for strolling all day long. 


Cashiers hosts its Christmas Parade on Saturday, December 8, at noon. This year's parade is titled “Over the River and Through the Woodes” and honors Camp Merrie Woode's centennial. Look for another appearance by Santa and then head to the nearby Community Center for the eleventh annual Christmas luncheon showcasing Cashiers Cares. The luncheon provides a timely opportunity to learn about the work of this “neighbors helping neighbors” organization which supports ten local charities. A hot dog luncheon will be provided by Cashiers Rotary Club, and Santa (he's everywhere!) and Mrs. Claus will be guests of honor for those wanting photos.


Christmas, of course, would not be Christmas without special music and The Cashiers Adult Community Chorus is practicing for its Christmas concert to be presented in the Sanctuary of the Cashiers United Methodist Church on Sunday, December 2 at 2 p.m. Selections include the "Sing Christmas" cantata.


Another community offering on December 21 is "A Bluegrass Christmas with Sierra Hull" at the Smoky Mountain Center for the Performing Arts. Sierra Hull is a singer and mandolinist who was the first bluegrass musician to receive a Presidential Scholarship to the Berklee College of Music.


Of course, merchants from Highlands to Cashiers will be a big part of the holiday spirit with lots of festive temptations. One must-see is the famed “Christmas Cottage” on Main Street in Highlands which has been a local landmark for more than thirty years. Richard Osborne, who owns the shop with his wife Teresa, says that Downton Abbey and Game of Thrones themed ornaments are very popular this year, as is an electric “climbing Santa” who walks up and down a ladder that can be leaned against a wall. Animated “Christmastime televisions” are also flying off the shelves. A visit here will fortify you for the rest of your holiday shopping and preparations.


And, before you know it, it's here!


Packages wrapped, family safely gathered, pantry fully stocked. By Christmas Eve it's time to slow down and remember what the season is all about. After all, isn't this where the best family memories are made?