blue ridge mountains

Gorgeous Mountain Lodge with Ample Room for Guests in Gated Bald Rock

Located in the premier equestrian community of Bald Rock, this gorgeous rustic mountain lodge is a sublime spot for wiling away the seasons amidst cool temperatures and making lifelong memories with family and friends. In harmony with the natural surroundings, the great room features a massive stone fireplace, wood walls and beams, cathedral ceilings and an abundance of windows for natural light. The family chef will love the gourmet kitchen with its large center island, six-burner gas cooktop, double ovens and warming drawer. Outfitted with clear shades for inclement weather, a covered living porch adjacent to the dining room offers another comfortable space for casual meals and relaxing by the fire. A grilling deck is just outside.

The versatile floor plan has ample room for hosting guests of all ages. The main-floor master suite has its own fireplace and an inviting bath with a jetted tub and separate walk-in shower. The main, upper and lower levels each have a guest suite, with the last boasting exterior access. Extras include a full generator, stone fire pit, and bonus room over the garage with an open living area, two sets of bunk beds, a full bath and open deck. The property is beautifully landscaped and adjoins national forestlands. Furnishings are negotiable.

Perched on the 3,500 to 4,200 foot ridge line of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Bald Rock is a close knit, laid back community with frequent get-togethers, trail rides, BBQs and other activities. Amenities include an equestrian center, a party pavilion with kitchen, and trailheads leading directly into Panthertown Preserve, the beautiful 6,300-acre National Forest known as the "Yosemite of the East." Ownership also includes access to the Sapphire Valley Resort, with golf, tennis, indoor and outdoor pools, a fitness center, ski slope and zip lines, plus sparkling Fairfield Lake for canoeing, fishing, swimming, picnics and more.

 

Highlands, North Carolina

Highlands, North Carolina has served as a showcase for the change of seasons for many families in the Southeastern United States for well over a century. A caravan of cars drives through the historic Main Street district during the summer months to enjoy the mild temperatures of the high elevations, and during the fall months to gaze in awe at the show of colors as the leaves change on the hardwood trees that line the mountain range. Downtown Highlands is a collection of quaint inns, upscale shops and renowned eateries that serve as a draw for vacationers from nearby South Carolina and Georgia.

The collection of country clubs in the Highlands is as widely varied as the collection of lush foliage. Thoughtfully designed golf courses abound, coexisting beautifully with the natural splendor that is synonymous with the area. Many of the luxury cottages and mountain estates in the area complement the natural setting on which they are constructed, featuring heavy timber and stone accents and offering awe-inspiring views of the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. Year round residents of Highlands live at an easier pace – they know when to pause and take a gander at a beautiful sunset or to stop and smell the wildflowers. We invite you to slow down long enough to experience the Highlands way of life.

 

Cashiers, North Carolina

Cashiers, North Carolina is one of the Southeast's premier resort destinations. Widely known for its amazing atmosphere, unique culture, upscale shopping and world-class dining, the historic village of Cashiers has been a haven for vacationing families for well over a century. Drawn to the natural beauty of the area and mild temperatures that accompany elevations of over 3,500 feet above sea level, countless visitors have selected Cashiers as their vacation spot of choice and keep returning, year after year.

For those who live here year-round, breathtaking views of the Blue Ridge Mountains continue to astound, the scents of wildflowers and mountain laurel blended together on a cool mountain breeze continue to inspire, and the activities of a stroll through an ancient forest or the time-honored tradition of a day of fly fishing continue to delight. Since its inception, the Cashiers community has been based largely upon a foundation of Southern Hospitality in celebration of nature's splendor. You are welcome to enjoy an outdoor concert on the Village Green, explore the gift shops that line the streets of Cashiers' downtown area, or just sit back, relax and breathe in the unforgettable sights and sounds that surround you.

One more thing ... if you want to blend in with the locals, make sure you pronounce Cashiers correctly! Although it looks like the word for a person who rings up your purchase at a store, it is actually pronounced KASH-erz.

 


 

 

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    Photographer Spotlight

    Growing up in Western North Carolina is something that can be hard not to take for granted. From the very beginning, professional photographer Brittany Scales noticed the beauty that surrounds us and felt the draw to capture its essence.
    The Blue Ridge Mountains have a way of inspiring creativity that some might find indescribable. Behind every ridge, in every flowing waterfall and stream, there is a constant sense of awe that just begs to be photographed. It’s this inspiration that motivates Brittany in her work every day. Whether a quick drive down the Blue Ridge Parkway, or a five-mile hike to a mountain summit; whether it’s in the details of the trail below or the way the light hits the ridge just right, the beauty is everywhere.
    After attending Savannah College of Art and Design to obtain her photography degree, Brittany recognized and learned to appreciate her ability to view the world in such a unique way. With her camera, Brittany aims to bring her viewers to see what can so often be overlooked and, as a result, gain the same sense of admiration that she has for the natural world.
    Although the majority of her work comes from her home of the Western North Carolina mountains, being able to travel and photograph new places is a huge passion of Brittany’s. “Maui and Yosemite National Park have to be two of my absolute favorite photographic destinations. The landscapes there are breathtaking, and there’s always something new to catch your eye, no matter how many times you visit.” On her bucket list, locations to photograph include Alaska, Iceland, and New Zealand.
    To see more of her work or to inquire about print requests, please visit her website at brittanyscales.com.

    Highlands Motoring Festival

     

    Longing to have a close-up encounter with a coveted Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing worth somewhere to the tune of two million dollars? Look no further than in your backyard to experience such a rare moment. At the Highlands Motoring Festival in Highlands, North Carolina, you never know which spectacular collectible car will take your breath away. This festival draws a sophisticated group of car collectors who showcase their pride and joy and give you the opportunity to admire and inquire. So, rev your engines and mark your calendars for this year’s Festival, an extraordinary weekend of unforgettable cars, community,  and camaraderie. 


    Touted as the “Festival with an Altitude,” the Highlands Motoring Festival (HMF) is proud to shout from the Blue Ridge Mountains that it is the highest motoring festival east of the Rockies. Celebrating its twelfth year, this rapidly-growing, family-friendly event attracts car collectors, enthusiasts, and the curious. This June, it is expecting around 3,500 attendees from across the nation, including 125 car owners for Saturday’s main judging event, “Cars in the Park.” 


    The vision behind the Highlands Motoring Festival is to produce a unique educational and social car event, creating a fundraising platform to give back to the community. With most car shows charging a hefty entrance fee, this festival is free to the public, making it even more special as a gift to the community. According to the motoring festival spokesman Steve Ham, “It is exciting to think that an open-to-the-public event like this could inspire someone to start collecting. It is a spectacular opportunity to celebrate the history of the automobile and experience many rare and exotic cars in one place.”


    The HMF weekend is chock full of daily events, from “Monte Carlo Night” to a scenic 160-mile technical driving rally called “One Lap of the Mountains” to the grand event, “Cars in the Park,” where a judging competition takes place. Trophies created by a local artist will be awarded to cars designated as Best in Class and Outstanding in Class. This year’s competition registration is already filling up with collectible sports cars like the 1966 Chevrolet Corvette and 1967 Porsche 912 making their inaugural trip to Highlands. Showcased at this year’s festival is an exciting new class of vintage racing cars with an established racing history in famous races such as Le Mans and the Daytona 500.


    The level of sophistication of this regional car show is quite evident by the impressive competition. Remarkable past entries include a 1926 Model T and the most unusual of entries, the Amphicar, which operates as both a car and a boat. Copious touring models and high-performance cars are also present. In the case of the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing, there was not only one at the show a couple of years ago, but three! Entrants are judged in eight different classes with an awards ceremony to follow. The car owners have gone to great monetary and physical lengths to restore and prepare their cars for show. 


    Fundraising dollars are raised through Platinum sponsors like Mercedes, Porsche, Ferrari, and BMW, as well as important local supporters, ticket sales, donations, and registration fees. All net proceeds from the HMF go to charity with this year’s event serving three beneficiaries: The Literacy Council, which endeavors to advance lifelong learning and a knowledgeable community; R.E.A.C.H., whose mission is to prevent family violence in all its forms; and the Community Care Clinic, which provides free medical services to the needy.


    If you have a pre-1990 collectible car you would like to register for the Saturday, June 8th competition, go to highlandsmotoringfestival.com. If you want to feel like you are walking onto a James Bond movie set, make a plan to attend any one of the weekend events. The pulse and enthusiasm of this unique class of people and cars is something you don’t want to miss.

    Monte Carlo Night
    THURSDAY NIGHT, June 6

    A high-stakes “gambling-for-good” fundraiser that kicks off the weekend hosted by Highlands Falls Country Club. Expect game tables, hors-d’oeuvres, cocktails, exotic cars, a live auction, and chances to win lots of “play money.” Cost per ticket: $75.

    One Lap of the Mountains
    FRIDAY DAY, June 7

    In its sixth year, this popular road rally is an adventure of a lifetime, giving participants an opportunity to explore a bespoke curvy route through the countryside. A technical rally rather than a timed rally, the event allows participants to meander 160 miles as a group over paved rural roads taking in vast mountain vistas, lush forests, waterfalls, pastures, historic landmarks, flora and fauna, and a multitude of lakes and babbling brooks. Passing road markers like Happy Place Lane and following detailed maps with directional cues such as “take a left at the hound dog by the red mailbox” make the route even more interesting and fun for drivers and their passengers. The lap begins at 9 am and ends at 3 pm with a stop for lunch along the way. Only a max of 40 cars are allowed. Register now so you don’t miss this special event. Cost per vehicle: $125 (includes one passenger).

    Welcome Party at High Dive
    FRIDAY NIGHT, June 7

    An evening meet and greet at Highlands’ newest watering hole, from 6 pm to 8 pm for all “gear heads” (that’s industry talk for car enthusiasts). Free to participate. No registration required.


    The Main Event: 
    Cars in the Park
    SATURDAY, June 8

    This classic car show with a judging competition takes place in the heart of Highlands at the Kelsey-Hutchinson Founders Park beginning at 11 am. Entrance is free for all spectators, but donations are greatly appreciated to benefit three local charities. Competition cars are judged and awarded Best of Class in the following car classes: Touring, Classic, Street Rod and Custom, American Sport and High Performance, Foreign Sport, Foreign Classic, and Trucks/Utilities. This year’s special interest class is Vintage Racing Cars, requiring a racing background in such prestigious and varied venues as Le Mans, Indianapolis, Daytona, Monte Carlo, etc. Competition entry cost: $35.

    After the car show ends at 4 pm, “Music in the Park” will round out the night beginning at 6 pm. Free to the public.

    Cars and Coffee
    SUNDAY, June 9

    Located in Wright Square, this casual morning send-off at 8:00 am allows participants and spectators alike to gather one last time, relive the weekend, and make future plans. Free to participate. No registration required. •

     

    Like-New Mountain Getaway in Cedar Hill

    Situated at 4,000 feet in the prestigious Cedar Hill community, this mountaintop getaway is based on a design by renowned local designer Travis Mileti. Featuring old-school appointments throughout, including a sliding barn door to the butler's pantry, shiplap wall coverings throughout and rustic, wooden window shutters, this home is the perfect meeting of comfortable, mountain-inspired design with modern, state-of-the-art creature comforts and fixtures.

    A multi-level deck featuring a covered porch and prominent stone fireplace offers the ideal setting for outdoor entertaining, with breathtaking views to the east of the striking 144-foot granite cliffs of Lonesome Valley and Bald Rock - among the largest exposed rock faces in the southeast - as well as Toxaway Mountain and Sapphire Valley. If cooler weather prompts company to move indoors, the spacious lower level features a full-service wet bar and ample sleeping arrangements, with two guest rooms and a pair of bunkrooms downstairs in addition to the two master bedrooms on the upper level.

    The open layout kitchen conjures images of friends and family gathering around the sprawling kitchen peninsula, topped with Cambria Quartz countertops, enjoying time together over food and a glass of wine from the adjoining wet bar and wine cooler. Another imposing stone fireplace is the focal point of the great room, which features a towering cathedral ceiling and offers its own incredible views of the surrounding mountain ranges.

     

    A Good Walk Spoiled: A Self-Proclaimed Duffer Continues Her Golf Struggle

    By all rights, I should have given up the game of golf years ago. There was the time, in the beginning, when I dutifully followed my husband to the practice range and proceeded to hit every golf ball in my bag with robotic precision. It was only as I swung at the last one that I noticed the huge baskets of range balls provided beside me.
    There was the time I unknowingly wore a pair of my husband's many golf shoes that I had nervously pulled from the trunk of our car upon arriving at a friend's course. It was maybe on the second hole when I noticed I was sliding a bit in my backswing and I was too embarrassed to say a thing. Note to self: I can play a full round in a pair of men's size 10 shoes, though not very well.
    Perhaps I should have hung it up when I got a big laugh from my foursome when I asked my young caddy for my “five arm,” or the day I discovered that my 51 handicap was the highest of all the women in our club, including one extraordinary lady who happened to be legally blind.
    Why, 35-plus years into my golf odyssey, do I continue the struggle? Quite simply, I live on this beautiful plateau in the Blue Ridge Mountains and giving up the game would be like cutting off the proverbial nose to spite my face.
    It's not enough that drop-dead vistas of waterfalls, craggy mountains, lakes, and streams gift wrap each one of the public and private golf courses in the Cashiers-Highlands area. It's the rare place where you can ask a good golfer (of hole-in-one stature) to name her favorite hole, and she chooses a particular one because of the breathtaking flowers planted around the green.
    It's the place where Justin Thomas can break the course record at Mountaintop Golf and Lake Club one day, shooting a 64, and a University of Alabama sophomore, Robbie Shelton, can go out the next day and shoot a 61, according to Micah Hicks, the private club's director of golf. He also remembers the Bryan Brothers (George and Wesley) agreeing to caddy for the club's member/guest tournament and using the time up here to shoot a trick shot video at Mountaintop and Old Edwards Club. The video went viral on YouTube, raising enough money for Wesley to go on tour, where last year he won the RBC Heritage championship.
    There is a laid-back culture in this mountain air that attracts players of all levels. Tom Fazio, who is renowned as the golf course architect of more than 120 courses worldwide, is a part-time resident of western Carolina and a frequent local player. The designer of both the Mountaintop and Wade Hampton golf courses, he and his wife are partial to Mountaintop which allows family dogs to ride along on a round. Their dog Maggy frequently accompanies them and avails herself of the dog treats that are available at the course's comfort stations.
    The setting here allows golfers to get up close and personal with all sorts of wildlife as well. Golfers at the Country Club of Sapphire Valley remember the year that a mother bear and her cubs took up residence in a covered cart bridge on the sixth hole. After several heart-stopping encounters with golfers, the mama bear was “nudged” to a more remote area by a team of maintenance staffers. 
    For years, there were sightings of a three-legged bear called “Tripod” by the locals, and area golfers experience the occasional sightings of deer, bobcats, and turkeys. A sun-worshipping garter snake hung out on the same drainage pipe day after day one season, to the point that he came to be known as Freddie.
    People like me, as well as the good golfers, find pleasure in the “good walk spoiled” as John Feinstein famously wrote in his book of the same name.
    For someone new to the Plateau, there are numerous golf venues. The immediate area features 15 golf courses, three of which are public. The public courses are all different but together can provide an overview of the special nature of mountain golf.
    v The oldest is High Hampton, recently purchased by Daniel Communities, which is planning an extensive upgrade of the golf course-among other major improvements. A fun local legend explains the fact that for years the golf course had only 11 holes. The story goes that a previous owner, E.L. McKee, got the bill for those first 11 holes, was shocked by it, and cut off the project there. It would be decades before the other seven holes were added. High Hampton boasts some recent color, too, as the television version of the classic Dirty Dancing was filmed there in 2016, and many people on the staff were enlisted as extras.
    v Sapphire National Country Club offers a true traditional mountain golf experience. Rated four and-a-half stars by Golf Digest, the course showcases mountains, valleys, and waterfalls and a memorable fifteenth hole island green.
    v For a real change of pace, check out the Red Bird Links in Sapphire Valley. An executive course, which consists of six par three holes and three par fours, it's a great course for beginners as well as more seasoned players interested in polishing a short game. A weekly golf clinic is available during season, as well as a junior golf program, and the winter finds the course used for “foot golf,” a family-friendly game utilizing soccer balls.
    Like all golfing paradises, there are funny stories in those majestic mountains, another factor that keeps people like me coming back. One full-time resident, who has been know to tee it up on “mild” days in January, recalls an older gentleman who loved the game and had, in fact, “shot his age” several times. On one memorable outing, everyone drove onto the fairway from the tee box to hit their second shots. The gentleman struggled to find his ball, temporarily stopping the play, until he remembered that he hadn't hit a tee shot.
    There are countless stories of determined golfers falling into water in search of errant golf balls. What these stories all seem to have in common is white pants. I also heard the story of one friend trying to help another who had fallen into a pond, only to fall in himself for a double-whammy.
    Water, of course, is a huge component of the mountain golf scene, to the extent that one local golfer walks a course early some mornings, retrieving lost underwater balls as he goes. He donates his considerable yield to the First Tee Foundation which promotes values like integrity and perseverance in young golfers, a comforting thought to golfers like me who have left many a ball behind in the water.
    Then there was a gentleman from Japan who had very limited experience with the game. His host explained that the containers of sand on the cart were for divots. At the end of the round, the host discovered that his guest had carefully placed each and every divot he made into the container.
    As I write these stories, I'm beginning to feel better about my golf game. Did I mention the time I won a nine-holer season championship, only to be informed, post-award ceremony, that I had not played enough rounds to qualify? I can't make this up, but my Waterford bowl prize was taken away and handed to the second-place winner as I sipped my celebratory champagne. 
    And still, as long as I live in this beautiful place, I can't find the heart to quit. Nine and dine anyone?

    Mountains of Youth: Finding Longevity in Mountain Living

    At first glimpse of a mountain peak, I begin to feel it. I recognize it as a sensation of lightness, or possibly even giddiness. On my journey from the city to the Blue Ridge Mountains, my excitement builds with each mile marker. As my car climbs the first mountain to home, I notice a deep sense of calm sweeping over me. And as my breath deepens, I observe my racing thoughts slow and my blood pressure drops. My intuition tells me I have made the right move to leave the city behind and choose mountain living. While I trust my gut, some might need a little science to spur or confirm a decision.
    It’s obvious that fresh mountain air, a slower pace, cooler temperatures, and green spaces are good for us, new research tells us living in the mountains has positive health benefits and could actually prolong our lives. A recent study published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health concluded that living at higher altitudes creates a lower oxygen environment that mitigates heart disease. “Lower oxygen levels turn on certain genes, and we think these genes may change the way heart muscles function. They may also produce new blood vessels that create new highways for blood flow into the heart,” according to a study produced by the University of Colorado School of Medicine in partnership with the Harvard School of Global Health.
    Furthermore, higher altitudes stimulate a certain hormone called leptin that is responsible for weight management, proper metabolic function, and balancing our energy stores. Possibly because of leptin production, lower rates of cancer and obesity were also found in mountainous communities. Lower mortality rates, greater levels of positive mental health, and lower levels of stress and anxiety were found in mountain residents compared to those living in more urban environments. I like this new evidence!  Who doesn’t want a healthier heart, lower risk of cancer, less stress, and weight loss? This green, mountain living could really be the fountain of youth! 
    It is well known that living in a green environment is linked to stress reduction and well-being, and now it is concluded that a simple walk in the woods slows our heart rate and reduces anxiety. Using brain scans, heart-rate monitors, and behavioral tests on study participants, researchers, as reported by Scientific Reports, have proven the sounds of nature, like running water or birds singing, have restorative and positive physiological effects on our bodies and minds. 
    The Highlands-Cashiers Plateau has a long history of people seeking wellness in the Blue Ridge Mountains, whether it is to get away from it all or actually convalesce from an illness. Known as a health resort in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, this area drew people from afar to rejuvenate in the invigorating, clean air. We even had the first sanatorium in North Carolina in 1908 during a tuberculosis outbreak. 
    Things have not changed much over the decades as many people still come from far and wide to seek solace here. Of course, anyone who enjoys getting outdoors to golf, croquet, fish, hike, yoga, canoe, and camp can find all that and more in this area. Take away excessive light pollution and dangerous electromagnetic frequencies found in more urban settings, and you have found your panacea.
    And as if this couldn’t get any more perfect, our mountains are host to the highest number of vortexes, or energy fields, in the country according to Asheville Magazine. A vortex is thought to be a physical location that harnesses a great amount of positive and rejuvenating energy. Twenty-four vortex have been identified near the Highlands-Cashiers Plateau, attracting people who seek emotional healing, spiritual awareness, and tranquility. Some might call it a “mystical Mecca.”
    Just as the 19th-century naturalist John Muir famously penned, “The Mountains are calling and I must go,” many others are finding themselves “called” to this 400-million-year-old mountain chain. Once some of the highest mountains in the world, and despite being beaten down by time and erosion, the Appalachian Chain still proudly stands as the highest mountain range in the Eastern United States. The North Carolina Blue Ridge Mountains claim a good many of the highest peaks and have the blessed fortune of being a biodiverse temperate rainforest. 
    Some of this may explain why more people are choosing to leave the urban jungles behind for a more relaxing quality of life in the lush, green forests, and mountains with a hue of blue. Yes, we have to travel a little further for an international airport or shopping at Costco, but as we trade fast-paced living, traffic, and smog for cleaner air, taller trees, higher altitudes, and mountain vistas, we relish in our good sense and science’s findings, to feel young and alive here on the Plateau. •

    Lake Life

    It’s early morning and my senses are tuned to the quiet of the world around me. As I sit lazily on the dock in my Adirondack chair sipping my morning coffee, I watch the mist slowly rise off of the pristine lake before me, Lake Glenville in Western North Carolina. Hues of green and blue emerge as the soft water becomes dappled in the morning light. You cannot beat the tranquil sound of lapping water as it slowly rolls to shore. My family and most of my neighbors are still asleep with the exception of a few anglers in canoes off in a distant cove. The only significant signs of stirring are the tall trees caressed by a soft breeze and the gossiping birds that fill them. With each breath I take of clean, fresh air, the sun gains altitude and slowly shows itself over the blue mountain range in my view. The warmth of the sun soothes me. My cozy plaid wrap slips off my shoulders as I ease deeper into a meditative state of relaxation. Ah, this is the life—lake life in the early morning.


    With each hour of the day, this lake takes on a different personality. In the early morning, it supplies fuel to the soul for early-risers. Shortly thereafter, the paddle boarders and kayakers emerge to take on the glass-like waters. Once the day warms, the powerboats pulling skiers and giddy kids on inner tubes arrive. In the early evening before sunset, you’ll see friends and family lounging in pontoon boats idling along the shoreline exploring the lake one neighbor at a time and waving along the way. As darkness descends, the smell of charcoal wafts through the air as people fire up the grill for a summer supper under the stars. Laughter fills the air as groups gather, and the happy sound ripples across the water.
    In the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, second homeowners flock to these parts in the summertime for the cooler temps this altitude affords. It is a tough choice when buying a home here between mountain or lake views, although there are those lucky enough to have both. If you seek a low-stress life with a deep sense of peace, adventure, and community, then lake life might just be for you. 
    A lake community is a deeply woven place centered on fishing, water sports, family time, and barbeques. Neighbors come together for cocktails on the dock, impromptu dinners, and toasting marshmallows on an open fire. Life is good on the lake.
    Although there are many pristine bodies of water in the Highlands-Cashiers-Sapphire Valley area to consider, there are several lakes that have a great allure to many. A public lake offers lots to do and see all day, while private lakes cater to those looking for a quieter, more peaceful atmosphere with less distraction. Regardless, each area lake is unique with its own vibe, and the trick is finding the one that fits your dream of life on a lake.

    The largest public lake in the area and the only one that allows gas-powered boats, Lake Glenville is an emerald gem offering a dynamic lifestyle. With the highest elevation of any lake east of the Mississippi River, a vast size, and tremendous depth, there is much to be found on this public lake aside from water sports. Packed with islands, beaches, fishing holes, and waterfalls, this reservoir calls to those who want to live in the beauty of the Blue Ridge Mountains while overlooking an unspoiled body of water. Residents marvel in the richness of flora and fauna, the landscape contrasts of mountains sinking into the water and the glorious sunsets glistening across the surface of the lake. 
    Signal Ridge and Lakeshore are two marinas that help supply the fun for the community and visitors with boat and equipment rentals. From jet skiing to wakeboarding, one can find plenty of adventure on the water along with boats of all sizes and speeds. For anglers, Lake Glenville has a bevy of fishing holes teeming with bass, trout, catfish, and perch. Explorers will love the three big waterfalls and a hiking trail that leads to a fourth one (High Falls) with a breathtaking 150-foot drop. 
    Golfers who have dreamt of living on a stunning 18-hole championship golf course while enjoying lake and mountain views have found their wish at Trillium. This private residential club is adjacent to part of the lake and offers a multitude of recreational diversions and amenities. 
    For all lake homeowners, events of all kinds support the community including a season kick-off cocktail party hosted by Friends of Lake Glenville, barn dances throughout the summer, and the immensely popular Fourth of July fireworks show on the lake. 
    It is important to note that as a public lake there is an active recreational park, campground, and beach on the northern end where day-trippers and vacationers enjoy quick lake access.

    This historical 55-acre plus lake completed in 1896 was once land Cherokee and Creek Indian Tribes called home up until the early 1800s. Later in the nineteenth century, the land became the country’s primary mining site for gold and sapphires (word has it Tiffany & Co. once mined here). Just after the lake was created, a Victorian-style inn called Fairfield Inn on the National Historic Register was built and had a life on the lake, serving as a vacation resort for families looking for rest and relaxation in the mountains. Despite the diversified history of the land where the lake now lives, the sheer granite rock face of the beloved landmark, Bald Rock, has remained a constant. Standing watch over the lake, this magnificent natural sentry makes living near this lake all the more spectacular. 
    As part of the Sapphire Valley Resort, Fairfield Lake is an exclusive attraction only for its lucky members. You can find anglers fishing for bass and bream, kayakers, sailors, and swimmers. A boathouse offers rentals of fishing gear, kayaks, canoes, standup paddleboards, sailboats, and electric motor boats. Residences high above overlook the gentle lake and have magnificent views of Bald Rock, the surrounding national forest, and/or the Blue Ridge Mountains. There are three miles of hiking trails around the lake and one steep trail leading up Bald Rock. Nearby are waterfalls, mountain bogs, Camp Merrie Woode (where the gem and gold mine once stood) and an old Wishing Well that was once considered a “healing spring”. 
    Sapphire Valley has other private lakes such as Sapphire Lake and Hogback Lake. The latter, known for its fishing, is 35+ acres of pristine water surrounded by forest and Hogback Mountain. Charming residences and home sites are nearby with direct lake access.

    The largest private lake in North Carolina laced with million-dollar homes is Lake Toxaway, a charming Southern hideaway for the country club set. Steeped in a rich history dating back to the late 1800s, prominent families like the Fords and the Vanderbilts summered on the lake for relaxation, fresh air, and golf. 
    In the 1960s, the Lake Toxaway Country Club was founded with the same high standards in mind for family and friends to socialize in the mountains while living on an unspoiled lake. Members enjoy the 18-hole championship golf course with dramatic fairways created by Master Architect Kris Spence and a Tom Fazio Learning Center where golfers can perfect their practice. In addition, club amenities include a pro shop, clubhouse, fitness center, tennis courts, croquet, and dining. 
    The Nantahala and Pisgah National Forests and mountains such as Hawk, Panthertail, and Mt. Toxaway surround the lake. Its high elevation with long and short-range views creates a beautiful landscape to enjoy outdoor leisure including hiking, swimming, fishing, kayaking, and canoeing. While much of one’s life here is spent outdoors, there is an active social calendar filled with soirees, social clubs, and events throughout the season.