Jochen Lucke

Unbelievable Views and Lake Glenville Amenities in The Lake Club

Situated in the gated Lake Club, this stately manor has huge views looking south over Lake Glenville to the mountains beyond. This architectural masterpiece features a large chef's kitchen with a breakfast bar perfect for relaxed entertaining. The sophisticated living areas flow onto an expansive deck and a roomy covered porch with a wood-burning fireplace. Invoking an old-world feel, antique oak floors, custom built-ins, and ship-lap paneling accent the huge stone fireplaces in the upstairs and downstairs living rooms. 

The luxurious master suite has access to a deck overlooking the epic views below. The top floor offers a large home office or bedroom, while the family room on the lower level has a kitchenette and another deck.

Unlike many mountain homes, this home has storage for vehicles, with both a carport and a two-level garage. The downstairs garage has plenty of room for toys with room remaining for a workshop. The long private driveway provides a picturesque first impression and plenty of parking. 

The Lake Club features a large enclosed clubhouse, offering generous porch and deck space, living and dining areas, a fitness center, children's playroom and kitchen. The community dock provides a convenient place to keep a boat and enjoy sparkling Lake Glenville at a moment's notice.

 

Cedar Hill

Situated between Cashiers and Sapphire Valley, Cedar Hill is an upscale gated community offering its residents awe-inspiring views and the very best in luxury mountain living. Whether searching for the latest in elegant mountain construction or a very special lot to call your own, Cedar Hill will not disappoint. An easy hike from your backdoor will lead you to the natural splendor of waterfalls set amongst a backdrop of hardwoods. Be one with nature, but enjoy the modern conveniences of underground utilities available to all home sites and a short drive into town.

Residents of Cedar Hill have access to all of the amenities of nearby Wyndham Resort at Fairfield Sapphire Valley, including golf, swimming, tennis, fitness and much more (see Sapphire Communities for more information).

 

Trillium Links and Lake Club

True to its credo — "Where Families Belong" — Trillium is among the most exciting, family-friendly properties on beautiful Lake Glenville. Striking homes featuring Arts and Crafts and Adirondack style architecture line the community's streets, showcasing special characteristics such as stone and timber accents, poplar bark siding and exposed beams. Each home is designed to exist in harmony with the awesome show of nature that can be found throughout Trillium. The award-winning 18-hole championship golf course, designed by Morris Hatalsky, is as challenging as it is beautiful. Clinics and private lessons are available with the full-time pro on site. The less challenging par three Garden Golf course is a terrific amenity the entire family can enjoy without the worry of tee times and scorecards. A day of fishing in any one of Trillium's stocked ponds, picnicking at the Lakeside Pavilion or playing a game of croquet on the Arbor Lawn will bring new meaning to the word "carefree."

Set at the heart of the community, Trillium's outstanding clubhouse combines mountain laurel accents with dry stacked stoned for an inspired gathering place that gives the feel of luxury housed within an old, rustic lodge. The clubhouse is an integral part of life at Trillium, offering residents casual dining in the Grille Room overlooking the 18th fairway, a wraparound porch for world-class dining with a view, and an expansive lawn for hosting special community events on holidays like Easter, Fourth of July and Labor Day. Gourmet dining is also available at The Landings, set at the tip of Lake Glenville, with opportunities for a romantic view of the sunset and dinner by candlelight.

Apple Orchard Park is Trillium's popular fitness and wellness center, boasting three indoor clay tennis courts and state-of-the-art fitness equipment, as well as services like fitness classes and spa treatments. Central to it all lies Lake Glenville. Trillium has a fleet of boats available for rental, including canoes, kayaks, fishing boats, deck boats, runabouts and pontoons. Water ski equipment and other water sport items are also available to rent. A short drive to nearby Cashiers provides family members with a fun-filled day of shopping and strolling the streets of an historic resort village. There is no shortage to the number of adventures a family can have while living at Trillium.

 

First Time on the Market in Picturesque Cedar Ridge Estates

Situated on a cul-de-sac for the utmost privacy, this tastefully remodeled one-story home has a stunning view of Whiteside Mountain. Bathed in natural light, the living room with a stone fireplace opens onto the spacious covered deck with yet another fireplace, offering a space for outdoor dining and casual relaxation. The high-quality finishes are second to none, from the chef’s gourmet kitchen and shiplap-covered walls to the custom cabinetry and tailored window treatments. The spacious master suite accesses the open deck just steps away from the fire pit and gently sloping backyard, perfect for an evening of conversation and laughter. Two additional bedrooms with en-suite bathrooms as well as a cozy family room with a wet bar round out this one-story home. The circular driveway and two-car garage provide plenty of parking. On the market for the very first time, don't miss out on this lovely home in a peaceful community.

Cedar Ridge Estates is private, yet conveniently located just minutes from the Crossroads and several golf and country clubs, such as Cedar Creek Club and the Country Club of Sapphire Valley; both memberships are by invitation only. 

 

Thanksgiving, Mountain Style

Thanksgiving on the Plateau is becoming a holiday tradition as more and more people are discovering the pleasures of food, family, and football at 3,500 feet. For others, it is the weekend that officially signals the end of the summer and fall seasons and an obvious time to fill the house or cabin with loved ones. It provides the warmth of a family gathering without all the stress that often comes with Christmas.
But for those of us who see nothing stress-free in preparing a delectable feast, there are ways to ease the burden. More and more local businesses stand ready to streamline the holiday with an array of delicious offerings that seem homemade but require little effort.
Robin Crawford, for example, the well-known proprietor of the Cashiers Farmer’s Market, will be offering everything from all-natural turkeys you prepare at home to multi-course à la carte meals you build from her considerable list of sides.  Typically, she says, she offers meals to serve four to six people and a customer may pick up a fully cooked turkey along with any number of sides, including a squash casserole, green beans, and “pilgrim mashed potatoes,” a recipe similar to twice-baked potatoes without the skin but with lots of butter. She can even provide the homemade gravy. All the traditional pies will be available, of course!  
While Thanksgiving marks the end of the season for the Farmer’s Market, they will stock garlands and greenery to usher in the Christmas holidays.  Some people, she says, will put a fall-colored bow on a green wreath and just change the ribbon to green or red as Christmas nears. She also carries a fun selection of yard decorations—turkeys and pumpkins mounted on wire to be stuck in the ground—and can provide simple centerpieces made from straw.
In Highlands, the Mountain Fresh Grocery at the bottom of Main Street offers a complete traditional dinner for six people, the centerpiece being a butter-basted turkey or spiced, glazed ham cooked Thanksgiving morning. The meal includes dressing, traditional green bean casserole, cranberry relish, Yukon gold mashed potatoes, turkey herb gravy, and homemade yeast rolls. For dessert, the market offers Granny Smith apple, pumpkin or pecan pie.
A new and welcome addition to Thanksgiving take-out this year is Sapphire Valley’s Library Restaurant and Bar. Executive Chef Johannes Klapdohr anticipates a traditional menu with a Southern accent or two,  such as collard greens and macaroni and cheese. He, too, will be preparing ham, and orders may be picked up on Thanksgiving morning.
Ingles is another helpful source, offering a fully-cooked turkey or ham dinner for the holidays. A variety of side dishes are available, including homestyle gravy, sweet potato casserole, broccoli and rice casserole, and Amish-style cole slaw.
If you fall somewhere in between doing dinner from scratch and carrying it home ready-made, the Plateau offers lots of help. The Spice and Tea Exchange in Highlands is stocking a wonderful assortment of seasonings to dial your cooking up a notch. Consider, for example, a turkey or ham herb rub. Manager Adison Harris also recommends a baker’s spice blend, a pumpkin pie spice blend, and an autumn harvest blend which intensify the flavors of fruit breads, soups, squash, and sweet potatoes. Another idea she suggests for a home celebration is a mulling mix spice blend that is delicious with apple juice or red wine.
Fresser’s in Highlands will have “everything from soup to nuts,” according to chef Debbie Grossman. Pick up an order of roasted butternut squash and chestnut bisque or a casserole of bourbon sweet potatoes, made, she assures, with excellent bourbon. She can help with the night before Thanksgiving as well, providing her legendary lasagna.
Save room for dessert, because the choices are staggering. Most all the sources listed above will have traditional pies available. Additionally, Whitney Henson, regional manager of Cream and Flutter in Slabtown, says   by Thanksgiving week, she will have the three favorites in her store: pumpkin and apple, of course, but also pecan, which comes in regular, chocolate, or bourbon flavors. The pies can be ordered with 24-48 hours’ notice and may be picked up from the “take and bake” line, which enables you to take the unbaked pie home to bake it in your own oven just like grandma might have done.
Another sublime source for homemade pie is Appalachian Harvest on Main Street in Highlands, where Kimberly Baldwin already has orders for more than thirty.  The pies, which are so heavy they require two hands to hold, are legendary for their organic and generous fruity fillings. Her jarred marmalades, fillings and jellies, which are also sold in Williams Sonoma and Whole Foods Market, include several which are perfect for Thanksgiving. She makes a rich cranberry relish and also recommends a homemade holiday pepper jelly, made from pecans and cranberry.
Of course, there is always the option of dining out, and the choices are enticing. Madison’s, at Old Edwards Inn in Highlands, will be offering a full-service dinner, as will Wolfgang’s, also in Highlands.
Wolfgang’s will serve dinner in a series of seatings, beginning at 11:30 a.m. and ending at 4:00 p.m. The menu features such favorites as shrimp and lobster bisque, traditional turkey or ham, as well as a slow-braised lamb shank with root vegetables.  
The Verandah, not to be outdone, will be serving an extensive buffet from noon to 6:00 p.m., featuring a “cold table” laden with shrimp and salads and a hot buffet serving the traditional turkey as well as “turducken,” made of boneless turkey, duck, and chicken held together with stuffing. An elaborate dessert bar will finish off the experience, including traditional pie as well as an assortment of cookies.
And so, like those Pilgrims hundreds of years ago, we gather together for what can only be called a magnificent mountain feast. ◊

Lake Glenville

The crown jewel of the Glenville community – at 3,500 feet above sea level – Lake Glenville is the highest lake east of the Mississippi. With a surface area of over 1,400 acres and 26 miles of shoreline, Lake Glenville draws visitors from all over the Southeast to its pristine waters and glorious scenery. The high elevation provides pleasant climates year round, as well as incredible views of the lake, mountains, forest and waterfalls that are common in the region. Whether fishing, boating or swimming in this extraordinary lake, once you set foot in Lake Glenville, gently stirring her glassy surface, you'll feel a stirring in your own heart. This feeling keeps visitors returning year after year, as they continue to build upon their special memories of days spent at the lake.

Lake Glenville real estate offers close proximity to the historic resort village of Cashiers, providing residents with an opportunity to shop and dine to their heart's content. Homes on Lake Glenville provide the best of both worlds – waterfront home combined with mountain home. A handful of Glenville communities provide a country club environment, all of which celebrate the natural beauty of the region.

 

Cruising the Waters: Barging through the canals of Strasbourg, France

Located near the border of Germany, the charming town of Strasbourg, France invites with its architecture, canals, and streetside cafés. According to TripAdvisor, the number one attraction is the cathedral. Victor Hugo referred to this 12th-century Gothic structure as a “light and delicate marvel.” It is breathtakingly beautiful and the views of the Rhine River from the top of Strasbourg Cathedral will linger in your heart forever. 
Find your favorite scenes casually jaunting through Strasbourg, canal to café on a private barge (captain included), or café to café, indulging in the region’s epicurean delights. 
Quickly becoming the ultimate way to explore, traveling the canals in your private hotel on the water, a luxury barge, is a one-of-a-kind experience. Whether you are seeking wine, culinary delights, hot air-ballooning, or sight-seeing, your 6-star accommodations can transport you to where you need to go. 
Strasbourg is in the region of Alsace, and home to a lovely Crémant, a bubbly produced outside of the Champagne region of France. A private tour of the vineyards is highly recommended. The area is one of France’s exceptional wine regions, producing mostly white wines such as Riesling. Follow the Route des Vins, or Wine Route, through picturesque villages like Eguisheim and Ribeauvillé for a memorable journey.
I had the opportunity to explore the canals of Strasbourg on a privately-owned barge. Upon arriving in Strasbourg, I spent the first night at Régent Petite France, a five-star boutique hotel nestled between the banks of River III and cobblestone magic in the La Petite Historic District. We filled our senses with local food and wine, wandering through cobblestone streets and unsuspecting alleyways to dine and sip at quaint bistro tables, all while feeling transported to a simpler time. 
Afternoons across the canal locks come to life at the French café courtyards serving a selection of French cheeses, foie gras, and French wine. Regional dishes derive from German culture. In Alsace, the most famous dish, choucroute garnie, is a version of German sauerkraut—a fermented cabbage cooked in white wine, beer, or cider and seasoned with juniper berries and black peppercorns and garnished with boiled potatoes and a variety of meats. This is a traditional Sunday meal.
True to Strasbourg’s ambiance, pastries are a popular delight of the area. You will find many patisseries with beautiful éclairs, tarts, macaroons, as well as the traditional kougelhopf, a brioche-type cake, often made with dried fruits and nuts, and baked in a special round, fluted pan.  
Bretzel, a large, freshly baked soft pretzel, salted or unsalted, with options such as melted cheese or accompanying smoked salmon, or even dusted with sugar for something sweet. If you are visiting in the spring, I hear the local white asparagus are something to write about. And Foie Gras d’Alsace is a local delicacy that is often found on menus.
One of my personal favorite dining experiences was in the formal dining room of Buerehiesel, a 19th-century glass atrium. It feels as though you are dining in your own private garden with the comforts of the indoors and fine cuisine. 
Strasbourg is the perfect place to take a stroll and enjoy the moments of life. The influence of German traits remains, and the flowers of Parisian springtime bloom among the storied bridges and historical clock tower. 

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Cashiers, North Carolina

Cashiers, North Carolina is one of the Southeast's premier resort destinations. Widely known for its amazing atmosphere, unique culture, upscale shopping and world-class dining, the historic village of Cashiers has been a haven for vacationing families for well over a century. Drawn to the natural beauty of the area and mild temperatures that accompany elevations of over 3,500 feet above sea level, countless visitors have selected Cashiers as their vacation spot of choice and keep returning, year after year.

For those who live here year-round, breathtaking views of the Blue Ridge Mountains continue to astound, the scents of wildflowers and mountain laurel blended together on a cool mountain breeze continue to inspire, and the activities of a stroll through an ancient forest or the time-honored tradition of a day of fly fishing continue to delight. Since its inception, the Cashiers community has been based largely upon a foundation of Southern Hospitality in celebration of nature's splendor. You are welcome to enjoy an outdoor concert on the Village Green, explore the gift shops that line the streets of Cashiers' downtown area, or just sit back, relax and breathe in the unforgettable sights and sounds that surround you.

One more thing ... if you want to blend in with the locals, make sure you pronounce Cashiers correctly! Although it looks like the word for a person who rings up your purchase at a store, it is actually pronounced KASH-erz.

 


 

 

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    Highlands, North Carolina

    Highlands, North Carolina has served as a showcase for the change of seasons for many families in the Southeastern United States for well over a century. A caravan of cars drives through the historic Main Street district during the summer months to enjoy the mild temperatures of the high elevations, and during the fall months to gaze in awe at the show of colors as the leaves change on the hardwood trees that line the mountain range. Downtown Highlands is a collection of quaint inns, upscale shops and renowned eateries that serve as a draw for vacationers from nearby South Carolina and Georgia.

    The collection of country clubs in the Highlands is as widely varied as the collection of lush foliage. Thoughtfully designed golf courses abound, coexisting beautifully with the natural splendor that is synonymous with the area. Many of the luxury cottages and mountain estates in the area complement the natural setting on which they are constructed, featuring heavy timber and stone accents and offering awe-inspiring views of the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. Year round residents of Highlands live at an easier pace – they know when to pause and take a gander at a beautiful sunset or to stop and smell the wildflowers. We invite you to slow down long enough to experience the Highlands way of life.

     

    The Oscars of the Food Industry

    It’s no secret that the world currently has an overabundance of celebrity chefs. They put their name on everything from spatulas to dog food. In this day of blogs and YouTube, anyone can aspire to achieve celebrity status and acquire their own show (and a cult following) on the television channel that’s wholly dedicated to food. You could even say that the celebrity chef movement spawned an onslaught of celebrity psychologists, celebrity doctors, and celebrity dog trainers.


    But long before reality TVbefore cooking was even a form of entertainmentAmerica was not a place that came to mind when people thought of sophisticated gastronomy. It took pioneers such as Julia Child to bring America to the forefront of gourmet cooking. Although many consider Child to be the first celebrity chef, it was a man named James Beard who hosted the first-ever televised cooking show. 
    Many know his name, but few know much about him. Born in 1903, Beard emerged from a culture of microwaved TV dinners, Jell-O molds, and Spam. He was raised in the Pacific Northwest by his self-sufficient English mother, who taught him to cook the seafood and wild berries that they gathered themselves from the Oregon beach.


    A fierce student of the theater, he lived abroad for several years to pursue his dream of acting at his mother’s encouragement. After eight years of failing to break into theater or movies, Beard was forced to learn to make money some other way. He started a catering business that later blossomed into a food shop called Hors d’Oeuvre, Inc. He then began what was to be a prolific career writing cookbooks (he would publish over twenty-five of them before his death in 1985). Upon his return from the war in 1945, Beard jumped right back into the culinary world, appearing on NBC in America’s first cooking show. 


    “This is Sarasota Unbleached Flour. Let me tell you what unbleached means. It means untouched, unartificial, unfooled with, untampered with, unmessed with, unfiddled with, uncorrected, unperfected,” a stout James Beard matter-of-factly touts to the camera. 
    This commercial for Sarasota Flour encapsulates just what made James Beard such an icon. He was one of the first to shake America from its lazy slumber of canned food and baking mixes. Some have described this period as “the death of food.” Companies had discovered the gold mine that was the American housewife and the result was a movement of factory farming, fast food, and processed food that America has yet to fully recover from. Beard railed against the idea that easy is always better. He suggested buying produce when it’s in seasona common sense idea that was revolutionary in a time when “organic” was just thought of as a type of chemical compound. 


    As his ideas gained popularity, Beard established the James Beard Cooking School, with locations in New York City and Seaside, Oregon. He spent the remainder of his life writing cookbooks, traveling, and tirelessly teaching others his concepts of good food, ethically prepared with fresh ingredients. He was eventually recognized by the New York Times as the “Dean of American cookery” for his efforts in coalescing American cooking traditions into a national cuisine.


    Upon his death, Julia Child urged Peter Kump, a former student of the James Beard Cooking School, to purchase Beard’s Greenwich Village brownstone and continue Beard’s legacy. Although its purpose has expanded over time, the James Beard Foundation’s core principles have remained the same as was originally stated by a press release on the day it opened in 1986: “to provide a center for the culinary arts and to continue to foster the interest James Beard inspired in all aspects of food, its preparation presentation, and of course, enjoyment.”


    The foundation now hosts over 250 events annually, featuring bourgeoning chefs from all over the world. It also launched the James Beard Awards, considered to be the food industry’s highest honor and called by Time magazine “the Oscars of the food world.” For more information about James Beard or to see the James Beard Foundation’s calendar of events, visit the foundation’s website at jamesbeard.org.