fishing

Lake Glenville

The crown jewel of the Glenville community – at 3,500 feet above sea level – Lake Glenville is the highest lake east of the Mississippi. With a surface area of over 1,400 acres and 26 miles of shoreline, Lake Glenville draws visitors from all over the Southeast to its pristine waters and glorious scenery. The high elevation provides pleasant climates year round, as well as incredible views of the lake, mountains, forest and waterfalls that are common in the region. Whether fishing, boating or swimming in this extraordinary lake, once you set foot in Lake Glenville, gently stirring her glassy surface, you'll feel a stirring in your own heart. This feeling keeps visitors returning year after year, as they continue to build upon their special memories of days spent at the lake.

Lake Glenville real estate offers close proximity to the historic resort village of Cashiers, providing residents with an opportunity to shop and dine to their heart's content. Homes on Lake Glenville provide the best of both worlds – waterfront home combined with mountain home. A handful of Glenville communities provide a country club environment, all of which celebrate the natural beauty of the region.

 

Trillium Links and Lake Club

True to its credo — "Where Families Belong" — Trillium is among the most exciting, family-friendly properties on beautiful Lake Glenville. Striking homes featuring Arts and Crafts and Adirondack style architecture line the community's streets, showcasing special characteristics such as stone and timber accents, poplar bark siding and exposed beams. Each home is designed to exist in harmony with the awesome show of nature that can be found throughout Trillium. The award-winning 18-hole championship golf course, designed by Morris Hatalsky, is as challenging as it is beautiful. Clinics and private lessons are available with the full-time pro on site. The less challenging par three Garden Golf course is a terrific amenity the entire family can enjoy without the worry of tee times and scorecards. A day of fishing in any one of Trillium's stocked ponds, picnicking at the Lakeside Pavilion or playing a game of croquet on the Arbor Lawn will bring new meaning to the word "carefree."

Set at the heart of the community, Trillium's outstanding clubhouse combines mountain laurel accents with dry stacked stoned for an inspired gathering place that gives the feel of luxury housed within an old, rustic lodge. The clubhouse is an integral part of life at Trillium, offering residents casual dining in the Grille Room overlooking the 18th fairway, a wraparound porch for world-class dining with a view, and an expansive lawn for hosting special community events on holidays like Easter, Fourth of July and Labor Day. Gourmet dining is also available at The Landings, set at the tip of Lake Glenville, with opportunities for a romantic view of the sunset and dinner by candlelight.

Apple Orchard Park is Trillium's popular fitness and wellness center, boasting three indoor clay tennis courts and state-of-the-art fitness equipment, as well as services like fitness classes and spa treatments. Central to it all lies Lake Glenville. Trillium has a fleet of boats available for rental, including canoes, kayaks, fishing boats, deck boats, runabouts and pontoons. Water ski equipment and other water sport items are also available to rent. A short drive to nearby Cashiers provides family members with a fun-filled day of shopping and strolling the streets of an historic resort village. There is no shortage to the number of adventures a family can have while living at Trillium.

 

The Nirvana of Fly Fishing

 

The mountains of western North Carolina lure those far and wide seeking higher elevations, stunning views, waterfalls, and verdant forests. However, it is the copious streams, creeks, and rivers lying within these mountains that draw fly fishermen, of all levels and skills, year-round. North Carolina’s waterways are abundant with wild or stocked rainbow, brown and brook trout as well as smallmouth bass in mid-summer.

 

When asked what attracts them to the sport, many fly fishermen find it hard to put into simple terms. The collective agrees there is no easy formula in making “the catch,” for an angler is challenged before even stepping into the water. The sport requires thought, instinct, and strategy. Great consideration goes into understanding the fish on that particular day, on that particular stream, since it varies day-to-day, stream-to-stream, season-to-season. Sometimes is varies hour-to-hour. One must consider the fish’s relationship with its environment, the weather, water temperature, level, and current. What and where does it eat now? The answers are key in crafting a cunning approach to the day’s journey.

 

“There is an art to fly fishing,” according to Ben Elmer, an avid fisherman, prominent local guide and manager at Brookings Anglers in Highlands. “The draw for me comes with chasing the fish and convincing them to eat my fly.” With tens of thousands of artificial flies to consider, wisely choosing a fly that best matches the current bug hatch creates a greater opportunity for this to happen. Equally as important to an aspiring fish catcher is mastering casting techniques where the fly mimics the actual habits of the “bug du jour.”

 

Elmer describes the scene on the river. An angler first strategically scopes out an ideal location where the fish might be found. He then chooses his fly, not just any fly, the right fly that will tease and tempt the fish. After quietly wading into the water, he fortifies his stance, chooses his cast, and delivers his fly. Patiently he waits. Feeling camaraderie with nature and perhaps his fellow fisher friends nearby, he enjoys the whip and grace of his cast as his fly dances on the surface. There is no impatience in the wait as the rewards are great, and then suddenly, possibly many casts later, STRIKE! He hooks one. A rush of adrenaline courses through his veins as he works to keep the trout or bass on the line. His skill at properly setting the hook will hopefully secure the catch as the duel plays out. However, stalking and catching the fish is only part of the game. “It is not over until the fish is successfully in the net,” says Elmer, “and that is a challenge in itself.”

 

Gail Bell, a ten-year veteran fly fisherwoman from Scaly Mountain, North Carolina says, “Fish are spooky and smart. Stealthiness is always your mantra. Imagine, now the fish has his choice from tens of thousands of natural food floating by. What are the odds he will choose your artificial fly? But when he does ... POW ... lights out awesomeness! It can be spiritual and technical with a little luck thrown in.”

 

“You don’t have to catch a fish though to have a good time,” Elmer shares like a secret. Fishermen are unique in the experiences they seek. Some choose to float rather than wade, some want private over public waters and some prefer to fish in the quiet winter months when they can take their catch home. Finding a peaceful experience grounded in nature is ideal for some who want to “get away from it all,” while others seek the thrill of the chase.

 

American author Norman MacLean who wrote A River Runs Through It equates fly fishing to a piece of music that slowly builds to an exciting crescendo. Maybe this metaphor best explains the growth of the sport and its captive audience of all genders and ages. Regarded as being meditative and therapeutic, restorative fly fishing retreats are plentiful and hosted by groups such as Casting Carolinas for cancer survivors and Project Healing Waters for military personnel and disabled veterans.

 

Brookings Anglers, with locations in Cashiers and Highlands, is a trustworthy resource for finding the best experience. Their guided trips are a terrific way to learn, grow, and perfect techniques. In addition, they offer fly tying courses, licenses, and full or half-day packages for individuals, couples, and groups. Packages start at $200.

 

 

Here is Redington’s Quick Guide to Common Fly Fishing Terms:

Cast: This is the motion you make when you collectively 'throw' a fly rod, reel and line.

Delivery: Used to describe the action of casting the fly to a fish or into a promising-looking area of water. 

Dry Fly: Any fly fished upon the surface of the water, usually constructed of non-water-absorbent materials. Dry flies are most commonly used to imitate the adult stage of aquatic insects. 

Fly: A hand-tied artificial lure imitating natural insects or baitfish to entice fish.
Fly Casting: A standard method of presenting a fly to a target using a fly rod and fly line.

Forward (or Power) Stroke: In fly fishing, casting is a back-and-forth motion of the rod and line that allows you to place your fly where you'd like.

Hatch: A large number of flies of the same species.  

Matching the Hatch: An attempt by a fly angler to select an artificial fly that imitates the color, size, shape, and behavior of natural insects that fish are feeding on at a particular time. Often when a hatch is happening, fish become very selective and refuse insects that do not match the predominant insects present. 

Mayfly: Commonly found in cold or cool freshwater environments, mayflies are the most commonly imitated aquatic insects worldwide.

Roll Cast: This is a main cast every fly fisher should master. It can be used to cast short to medium distances - 15 to 30 feet of line.

Setting the Hook: The act of pulling the hook into the flesh of the fish's mouth.

Stalking: The action of creeping up on a fish so as not to surprise or disturb it. 
Stance: The foot of the casting side should be back at roughly a 45-degree angle from the lead foot and about shoulder width apart. Right handed: right foot back. Left handed: left foot back. This stance allows your body to twist back and forth with the cast easily.

Strike: The attempt a fish makes to eat a fly, successfully or not. This term also refers to the movement of the rod a fly angler makes to set the hook. 

Wet Fly: Any fly fished below the surface of the water; nymphs and streamers are wet flies.